A simple animal model of hyperammonemia

Authors

  • Inmaculada Azorín,

    1. Institute de Investigaciones Citológicas de la Caja de Ahorros de Valencia, Centro Asociado del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46010 Valencia, Spain
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  • María-Dolores Miñana,

    1. Institute de Investigaciones Citológicas de la Caja de Ahorros de Valencia, Centro Asociado del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46010 Valencia, Spain
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  • Vicente Felipo,

    1. Institute de Investigaciones Citológicas de la Caja de Ahorros de Valencia, Centro Asociado del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46010 Valencia, Spain
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  • Dr. Santiago Grisolía

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute de Investigaciones Citológicas de la Caja de Ahorros de Valencia, Centro Asociado del Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, 46010 Valencia, Spain
    • Instituto de Investigaciones Citológicas de la Caja de Ahorros de Valencia, Centro Asociado del CSIC, Amadeo de Saboya 4, 46010 Valencia, Spain
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Abstract

Rats were fed a standard diet or the standard diet supplemented with ammonium acetate (20% w/w) for up to 100 days. The effect of the ingestion of the high-ammonium diet on some aspects of nitrogen metabolism in rats was studied. Ammonia levels in blood increased ≈3-fold; in brain, liver and muscle the increases were 36, 34 and 50%, respectively. Urea levels in blood and urea excretion increased ≈2-fold. There was no increase of carbamyl phosphate synthase. Liver glutamine synthase activity increased by 58% and glutamate dehydrogenase by 40%, whereas glutaminase was not affected. Glutamine content in brain was twice that of controls. This new animal model to study hyperammonemia offers several advantages over others: it is simpler, is bloodless, requires no animal manipulation and permits long-term studies.

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