Plexiform neurofibromatosis of the liver and mesentery in a child

Authors

  • Jacqueline S. Partin M.S.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Pediatrics, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794–8111
    • Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, HSC T-11 Room 020, Stony Brook, NY 11794–8111
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  • Bernard P. Lane,

    1. Pathology, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794–8111
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  • John C. Partin,

    1. Pediatrics, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794–8111
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  • Lawrence R. Edelstein,

    1. Pediatrics, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794–8111
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  • Cedric J. Priebe Jr.

    1. Surgery, School of Medicine, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794–8111
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Abstract

Plexiform neurofibromatosis of the liver was recognized by needle biopsy of the liver in an 11-yr-old boy who had a 2-yr history of diarrhea, intermittent abdominal pain, failure to gain weight and progressive abdominal distention. Imaging studies demonstrated a large retroperitoneal mass; a laparotomy was performed. At surgery, the mesentery was greatly thickened by neurofibromas, and plexiform neurofibroma extended through the hilum of the liver. Light and electron microscopy demonstrated that in addition to the direct involvement by tumor, neural hyperplasia existed throughout the liver. The most distal ramifications of the portal spaces were filled with Schwann cells, bundles of unmyelinated nerves and perineurium-surrounded nerves containing myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. The ultrastructural findings were consistent with stimulation of proliferation of all the portal neural elements and tumoral tissue. The nontumoral response was more than simple hyperplasia because it appeared to result in fibrotic changes in the most involved areas and active breaching of the limiting plate with destruction of hepatocytes and collagen deposition throughout the liver. (HEPATOLOGY 1990;12:559–564).

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