Prophylactic sclerotherapy for esophageal varices: Long-term results of a single-center trial

Authors

  • Dr David R. Triger,

    Corresponding author
    1. University Departments of Medicine, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF, United Kingdom
    • Floor M, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF, United Kingdom
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  • Howard L. Smart,

    1. University Departments of Medicine, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF, United Kingdom
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  • Shorland W. Hosking,

    1. University Departments ofSurgery, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF, United Kingdom
    Current affiliation:
    1. Southampton General Hospital, Tremona Road, Southampton S09 4XY, United Kingdom
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  • Alan G. Johnson

    1. University Departments ofSurgery, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Survival after prophylactic sclerotherapy was assessed in a single-center study involving 99 cirrhotic (41 alcoholic) patients enrolled over 8-yr. The wedged hepatic vein pressure gradient was measured; those with pressure ≥ 12 mm Hg were randomized to receive sclerotherapy or no treatment. The rest were not randomized. Patients in all three groups who bled were treated with emergency endoscopy and sclerotherapy. Stratification according to presence of ascites was also undertaken. Median follow-up was 61 mo (range = 14 to 107 mo). Survival among unrandomized patients was significantly longer than among randomized patients (p < 0.006), but there was no significant difference between those treated by sclerotherapy and the controls (p = 0.27). Alcoholic cirrhotic patients undergoing sclerotherapy had better 2-yr survival than did the controls (80% vs. 43%; p = 0.09), but this benefit was not sustained at 5 yr. Survival in the nonalcoholic patient groups was identical. Only 10 of 50 deaths were caused by variceal bleeding. Forty-eight percent of patients with large varices bled, compared with 20% of patients with small varices. Wedged hepatic vein pressure < 12 mm Hg accurately identified alcoholic patients at low risk of variceal bleeding but not nonalcoholic patients. Only four episodes of variceal bleeding were attributable to elective sclerotherapy.

We conclude that in our population, prophylactic sclerotherapy alone does not improve survival. The discrepancy in survival between alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhotic patients suggests that factors other than variceal hemorrhage may be responsible for the difference. (HEPATOLOGY 1991; 13:117–123).

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