Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt worsens the hyperdynamic circulatory state of the cirrhotic patient: Preliminary report of a prospective study

Authors


  • Part of this work was presented in abstract form at Digestive Disease Week, Boston, May 1993.

Abstract

The aim of this prospective nonrandomized study was to assess the immediate and short-term sequelae of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting on the circulatory hyperdynamic state of the cirrhotic patient. Twelve transjugular portosystemic shunting procedures were performed in 12 cirrhotic patients for sclerotherapy failure (10 cases) and/or intractable ascites (4 cases). Self-expandable stents 10 mm in diameter were used in all cases. Portal pressure measurement and right-heart catheterization were performed before and 30 min and 1 mo after the procedure. The portoatrial pressure gradient decreased from 15 ± 3 to 7 ± 3 mm Hg 30 min after surgery (p < 0.0001) to 8 ± 3 mm Hg 1 mo after surgery (p < 0.001, in comparison with basal values). The cardiac index increased from 4.5 ± 1.3 to 5.7 ± 1.5 L/min·m2 30 min after surgery (p < 0.001) to 7.4 ± 1.4 L/min μ2 1 mo after surgery (p < 0.001). Systemic vascular resistance decreased from 808 ± 323 to 646 ± 209 dyne·sec·cm−5 30 min after surgery (p < 0.01) to 467 ± 101 dyne·sec·cm−5 1 mo after surgery (p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that transjugular portosystemic shunting rapidly and significantly worsens the hyperdynamic circulatory state of the cirrhotic patient. Although apparently noninvasive, this procedure should be considered with caution in cirrhotic patients with limited cardiac reserve. (Hepatology 1994;19:129–132).

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