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Enzyme inhibitory autoantibodies to pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in primary biliary cirrhosis differ for mammalian, yeast and bacterial enzymes: Implications for molecular mimicry

Authors

  • Khay-Lin Teoh,

    1. Centre For Molecular Biology and Medicine, Monash University, Clayton 3168, Australia
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    • K. L. Teoh was supported by a Monash Graduate Scholarship.

  • Dr. Ian R. Mackay,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre For Molecular Biology and Medicine, Monash University, Clayton 3168, Australia
    • Centre for Molecular Biology and Medicine, Monash University, Clayton 3168, Victoria, Australia
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  • Merrill J. Rowley,

    1. Centre For Molecular Biology and Medicine, Monash University, Clayton 3168, Australia
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  • Shelley P. M. Fussey

    1. Biochemical Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712
    Current affiliation:
    1. Arnold, White & Durkee, Attorneys at Law, 2300 One American Center, 600 Congress Avenue, Austin, Texas 78701
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Abstract

Primary biliary cirrhosis is a chronic autoimmune disease in which serum autoantibodies against the mitochondrial 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase enzyme complexes (M2 antibodies) are regularly present. Molecular mimicry of host proteins by bacterial counterparts is a suggested explanation for the origin of these autoantibodies. We tested this hypothesis by measuring the functional reactivity of serum autoantibodies by means of an enzyme inhibition assay against pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from different sources: mammalian, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli. The 10 primary biliary cirrhosis sera all reacted on immunofluorescence study for M2 antibodies and on immunoblotting with the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2 subunit from each of the three enzymes, but there were strikingly different inhibitory capacities. The primary biliary cirrhosis sera were highly inhibitory for mammalian pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (10 of 10 inhibitory; mean level of inhibition, 99%), moderately inhibitory for yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (10 of 10 inhibitory; mean level, 70%) and weakly inhibitory for Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (4 of 10 inhibitory; mean level, 26%). Thus, with a functional assay that depends on epitope recognition of primary biliary cirrhosis sera, cross-reactivity between mammalian and bacterial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex enzymes is low and molecular mimicry, at least at the B-lymphocyte level, is not supported. (HEPATOLOGY 1994; 19:1029–1033.)

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