Effects of obesity on bile formation and biliary lipid secretion in the genetically obese JCR:LA-corpulent rat

Authors

  • Catherine M. St. George,

    1. Gastroinestinal Research Group, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T6G 2S2, Canada
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  • James C. Russell,

    1. Department of Surgery, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2S2, Canada
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  • Eldon A. Shaffer Dr.

    Corresponding author
    1. Gastroinestinal Research Group, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T6G 2S2, Canada
    • Foothills Hospital, Department of Medicine, 1403 29th St. N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2N 2T9, Canada
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Abstract

Obesity, a known risk factor in cholesterol gallstone disease, is a favorable factor in the formation of bile supersaturated with cholesterol. Previous studies have been indirect and limited to human beings. To better define the hepatic secretory defect, we directly measured bile secretion and bile salt kinetics in a genetically obese rat. Common bile duct cannulations and 24-hr bile collections were performed on 11 obese (homozygous for the cp gene) and 11 lean (heterozygous cp) female rats of the JCR:LA-cp strain. In absolute terms, obese rats had normal bile salt secretion rates, 28% larger bile salt pools and 45% greater bile salt synthesis than lean controls. Obese rats had twice the total liver DNA content of lean controls, indicating twice the liver cell number. In terms relative to liver cell number, bile salt synthesis per milligram DNA was no different in the obese rats and controls. Biliary secretion under basal conditions, when expressed per total DNA content, was significantly decreased in the obese rats. Bile salt and phospholipid secretion per milligram DNA were decreased 54% and 49%, respectively, whereas a lesser 31% reduction in cholesterol secretion resulted in an increased cholesterol saturation index. The bile salt secretion rate and bile flow per milligram DNA were both decreased by half in obese rats, a cholestatic state likely reflecting the accumulation of intracellular microvesicular fat and mitochondrial damage. The secretory defect in this model of obesity is therefore less bile salt and phospholipid in relation to the cholesterol secreted per liver cell. (Hepatology 1994;20:1541-1547).

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