Direct enumeration and functional assessment of circulating dendritic cells in patients with liver disease

Authors

  • Anne M. Wertheimer,

    1. Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
    2. Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
    3. Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center
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  • Antony Bakke,

    1. Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
    2. Department of Pathology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
    3. Divison of Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
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  • Hugo R. Rosen

    Corresponding author
    1. Division of Gastroenterology/Hepatology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
    2. Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR
    3. Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center
    • 3710 S.W. U.S. Veterans Hospital Road, Mail Code RD44, Portland, OR 97239-2999
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    • fax: (503) 402-2816


  • Presented, in part, at the 53rd AASLD meeting, November 1–5, 2002, Boston, MA.

Abstract

Chronic liver disease has been shown to be associated with diminished humoral and cellular immune function. Although antigen-presenting cells (APC) that initiate immune responses include various cells (B cells, endothelial cells, macrophages, etc.), the dendritic cell (DC) is a professional APC that activates naive T cells most efficiently. To examine the frequency and function of DCs in chronic liver disease, we studied circulating DCs from a cohort of 112 subjects (23 normal subjects, 29 subjects who had spontaneously recovered from hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection, 30 chronically infected HCV patients, and 30 patients with liver disease unrelated to HCV infection). Our analyses revealed significant reduction in both circulating myeloid (mDC) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in patients with liver disease. In contrast, examination of subjects with spontaneously resolved HCV infection revealed no significant difference in either circulating mDCs or pDCs. We found an inverse correlation with serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels and both mDCs and pDCs frequency. In a subset of patients for whom intrahepatic cells were available, paired analysis revealed enrichment for DCs within the intrahepatic compartment. Interferon alfa (IFN-α) production in response to influenza A and poly (I:C) correlated with the frequency of circulating DCs, although IFN-α production was comparable on a per-DC basis in patients with liver disease. In conclusion, patients with liver disease exhibit a reduction in circulating DCs. Considering that DCs are essential for initiation and regulation of innate and adaptive immunity, these findings have implications for both viral persistence and liver disease. (HEPATOLOGY 2004;40:335–345.)

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