Role of hepatic fibrin in idiosyncrasy-like liver injury from lipopolysaccharide-ranitidine coexposure in rats

Authors

  • James P. Luyendyk,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • Jane F. Maddox,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • Christopher D. Green,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • Patricia E. Ganey,

    1. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
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  • Robert A. Roth

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI
    • 218H National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824
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    • fax: 517-432-2310


Abstract

Coadministration of nonhepatotoxic doses of the histamine 2-receptor antagonist ranitidine (RAN) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) results in hepatocellular injury in rats, the onset of which occurs in 3 to 6 hours. This reaction resembles RAN idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in humans. Early fibrin deposition occurs in livers of rats cotreated with LPS/RAN. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that the hemostatic system contributes to liver injury in LPS/RAN-treated rats. Rats were given either LPS (44.4 × 106 EU/kg) or its vehicle, then RAN (30 mg/kg) or its vehicle 2 hours later. They were killed 2, 3, 6, 12, or 24 hours after RAN treatment, and liver injury was estimated from serum alanine aminotransferase activity. A modest elevation in serum hyaluronic acid, which was most pronounced in LPS/RAN-cotreated rats, suggested altered sinusoidal endothelial cell function. A decrease in plasma fibrinogen and increases in thrombin-antithrombin dimers and in serum concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 occurred before the onset of liver injury. Hepatic fibrin deposition was observed in livers from LPS/RAN-cotreated rats 3 and 6 hours after RAN. Liver injury was abolished by the anticoagulant heparin and was significantly attenuated by the fibrinolytic agent streptokinase. Hypoxia, one potential consequence of sinusoidal fibrin deposition, was observed in livers of LPS/RAN-treated rats. In conclusion, the results suggest that the hemostatic system is activated after LPS/RAN cotreatment and that fibrin deposition in liver is important for the genesis of hepatic parenchymal cell injury in this model. (HEPATOLOGY 2004;40:1342–1351.)

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