Maid (GCIP) is involved in cell cycle control of hepatocytes

Authors

  • Eva Sonnenberg-Riethmacher,

    1. ZMNH (Centre for Molecular Neurobiology) University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
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  • Torsten Wüstefeld,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Medical School of Hannover, Hannover, Germany
    2. Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA
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  • Michaela Miehe,

    1. ZMNH (Centre for Molecular Neurobiology) University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
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  • Christian Trautwein,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endocrinology, Medical School of Hannover, Hannover, Germany
    2. Department of Medicine III, University Hospital Aachen, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Medicine III, University Hospital Aachen, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
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  • Dieter Riethmacher

    Corresponding author
    1. ZMNH (Centre for Molecular Neurobiology) University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
    • ZMNH, Falkenried 94, 20251 Hamburg, Germany
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    • fax: (49) 40-42803-5359


  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

The function of Maid (GCIP), a cyclinD-binding helix-loop-helix protein, was analyzed by targeted disruption in mice. We show that Maid function is not required for normal embryonic development. However, older Maid-deficient mice—in contrast to wild-type controls—develop hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, we studied the role of Maid during cell cycle progression after partial hepatectomy (PH). Lack of Maid expression after PH was associated with a delay in G1/S-phase progression as evidenced by delayed cyclinA expression and DNA replication in Maid-deficient mice. However, at later time points liver mass was restored normally. Conclusion: These results indicate that Maid is involved in G1/S-phase progression of hepatocytes, which in older animals is associated with the development of liver tumors. (HEPATOLOGY 2007;45:404–411.)

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