Association between vascular endothelial growth factor gene polymorphisms and survival in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

Authors

  • Sun-Young Kong,

    1. Center for Clinical Services, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Research Institute & Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
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  • Joong-Won Park,

    Corresponding author
    1. Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute & Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
    • Center for Liver Cancer, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu-dong, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, 411-769, Republic of Korea
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    • fax 82-31-920-1520

  • Jung An Lee,

    1. Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute & Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
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  • Jung Eun Park,

    1. Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute & Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
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  • Kyung Woo Park,

    1. Center for Cancer Prevention and Detection, Research Institute & Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
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  • Eun Kyung Hong,

    1. Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute & Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
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  • Chang-Min Kim

    1. Center for Liver Cancer, Research Institute & Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea
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  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in angiogenesis and progression of tumor, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and elevated VEGF levels in serum and tissues have been known to be related with poor prognosis in patients with HCC. However, the effect of such polymorphisms of the VEGF gene on HCC prognosis has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the association between VEGF gene polymorphisms and HCC patient prognosis. The study involved 416 HCC patients treated at the National Cancer Center Korea from November 2000 to December 2005. The median patient age was 57 years, and 328 patients (78.8%) were men. A total of 19 polymorphisms were analyzed, and the hazard ratios (HRs) for genotypes and haplotypes were determined in terms of risk for overall survival using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Of the 19 alleles, 7 showed no heterozygous allele. PHASE analysis identified a total of 36 haplotypes. The −2578 to −1498 region of the VEGF gene showed a strong linkage disequilibrium (correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.91; Lewontin's D′, D′ = 0.982). The adjusted HRs were 0.67 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.46 to 0.99] for −634CC genotype carriers and 0.57 (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.92) for homozygous haplotype 1 (Ht1: CCGAGCCC at −2578/−1203/−1190/−1179/−1154/−634/−7/+936) carriers compared with noncarriers. Conclusion: These findings suggest that VEGF polymorphisms may be significant prognostic indicators for HCC patients. (HEPATOLOGY 2007.)

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