Elevations in alanine aminotransferase levels late in the course of antiviral therapy in hepatitis C virus RNA–negative patients are associated with virological relapse

Authors

  • Monica Basso,

    1. Centro per le Diagnosi e Terapia delle Epatiti, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Edoardo G. Giannini,

    1. Cattedra di Gastroenterologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy
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    • These authors contributed equally to this work.

  • Francesco Torre,

    1. Cattedra di Semeiotica Medica, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy
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  • Sabrina Blanchi,

    1. Centro per le Diagnosi e Terapia delle Epatiti, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy
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  • Vincenzo Savarino,

    1. Cattedra di Gastroenterologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy
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  • Antonino Picciotto

    Corresponding author
    1. Centro per le Diagnosi e Terapia delle Epatiti, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università di Genova, Genoa, Italy
    • Centro per le Diagnosi e Terapia delle Epatiti, Dipartimento di Medicina Interna, Università di Genova, Viale Benedetto XV, no.6, 16132, Genova, Italia
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    • fax: +390103538992.


  • Preliminary results of this study were accepted for presentation at the Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology (Orlando, FL. October 3–8, 2008), and were published in abstract form in the American Journal of Gastroenterology 2008;103(Suppl. 1):S122–S123.

  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

The incidence and clinical meaning of elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) in chronic hepatitis C patients who are hepatitis C virus (HCV)-RNA negative during pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin therapy have not been completely characterized. In this study our aim was to assess the incidence, pattern, predictive factors, and clinical meaning of elevated ALT in a cohort of 173 chronic hepatitis C patients who obtained viral clearance during either PEG-IFNα2a or α2b and weight-based ribavirin therapy. Patients were defined sustained viral responders (SVRs) or relapser responders (RRs) on the basis of a serum HCV-RNA result at 24-week follow-up. SVR and RR were obtained in 141 (58%) and 32 patients (13%), respectively. Among the 173 study patients, 57 patients (33%) had undetectable serum HCV-RNA and elevated ALT in at least one evaluation (weeks 2, 4, 12, 24 in all genotypes, and week 48 in HCV genotype 1 and 4 alone), and this phenomenon was not differently distributed between SVRs and RRs. No pretreatment demographic (age, gender), clinical (ALT levels, histological grade and stage, body mass index) and viral (load, genotype) parameter was associated with this phenomenon. The incidence of elevated ALT levels was not associated with type of PEG-IFN and ribavirin dose. Elevated ALT levels showed a different longitudinal pattern, occurring more frequently between week 12 and the end of treatment in RR as compared to SVR patients (90% versus 9%, P = 0.000001). Conclusion: The occurrence of elevated ALT levels in HCV-RNA-negative patients during PEG-IFN and ribavirin therapy is a fairly frequent and unpredictable phenomenon. Although ALT elevation per se is not associated with a greater risk of relapse, its occurrence in the later phases of therapy is more common in relapsing patients. (HEPATOLOGY 2009.)

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