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Coffee intake is associated with lower rates of liver disease progression in chronic hepatitis C§

Authors

  • Neal D. Freedman,

    Corresponding author
    1. Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD
    • Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, 6120 Executive Boulevard, EPS/320, MSC 7232, Rockville, MD 20852
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    • fax: 301-496-6829

  • James E. Everhart,

    1. Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD
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  • Karen L. Lindsay,

    1. Division of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA
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  • Marc G. Ghany,

    1. Liver Diseases Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD
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  • Teresa M. Curto,

    1. New England Research Institutes, Watertown, MA
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  • Mitchell L. Shiffman,

    1. Hepatology Section, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, VA
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  • William M. Lee,

    1. Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX
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  • Anna S. Lok,

    1. Division of Gastroenterology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI
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  • Adrian M. Di Bisceglie,

    1. Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
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  • Herbert L. Bonkovsky,

    1. Departments of Medicine and Molecular & Structural Biology and The Liver-Biliary-Pancreatic Center, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, CT
    Current affiliation:
    1. Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC
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  • John C. Hoefs,

    1. Division of Gastroenterology, University of California—Irvine, Irvine, CA
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  • Jules L. Dienstag,

    1. Gastrointestinal Unit (Medical Services), Massachusetts General Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
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  • Chihiro Morishima,

    1. Virology Division, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
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  • Christian C. Abnet,

    1. Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD
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  • Rashmi Sinha,

    1. Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, MD
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  • HALT-C Trial Group

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    • The HALT-C Trial was registered with clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT00006164).


  • This is publication #38 from the HALT-C Trial Group.

  • Financial relationships of the authors with Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc., are as follows: K.L.L. is a consultant and receives research support; M.L.S. is a consultant, on the speaker's bureau, and receives research support; W.M.L. receives research support; A.S.L. is a consultant; A.M.D. is a consultant, on the speaker's bureau, and receives research support; H.L.B. receives research support; J.C.H. is on the speaker's bureau. Authors with no financial relationships related to this project are: N.D.F., J.E.E., M.G.G., T.M.C., C.C.A., R.S., J.L.D., and C.M.

  • §

    The funding organizations had no role in the design and conduct of the study; the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data; or the preparation, review, or approval of the manuscript.

Abstract

Higher coffee consumption has been associated inversely with the incidence of chronic liver disease in population studies. We examined the relationship of coffee consumption with liver disease progression in individuals with advanced hepatitis C–related liver disease. Baseline coffee and tea intake were assessed in 766 participants of the Hepatitis C Antiviral Long-Term Treatment against Cirrhosis (HALT-C) trial who had hepatitis C–related bridging fibrosis or cirrhosis on liver biopsy and failed to achieve a sustained virological response to peginterferon plus ribavirin treatment. Participants were followed for 3.8 years for clinical outcomes and, for those without cirrhosis, a 2-point increase in Ishak fibrosis score on protocol biopsies. At baseline, higher coffee consumption was associated with less severe steatosis on biopsy, lower serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST)/alanine aminotransferase (ALT) ratio, alpha-fetoprotein, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment (HOMA2) score, and higher albumin (P < 0.05 for all). Two hundred thirty patients had outcomes. Outcome rates declined with increasing coffee intake: 11.1/100 person-years for none, 12.1 for less than 1 cup/day, 8.2 for 1 to fewer than 3 cups/day, and 6.3 for 3 or more cups/day (P-trend = 0.0011). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were 1.11 (0.76-1.61) for less than 1 cup/day; 0.70 (0.48-1.02) for 1 to fewer than 3 cups/day; and 0.47 (0.27-0.85) for 3 or more cups/day (P-trend = 0.0003) versus not drinking. Risk estimates did not vary by treatment assignment or cirrhosis status at baseline. Tea intake was not associated with outcomes. Conclusion: In a large prospective study of participants with advanced hepatitis C–related liver disease, regular coffee consumption was associated with lower rates of disease progression. (HEPATOLOGY 2009.)

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