SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • 1
    Lopez-Garcia E, van Dam RM, Li TY, Rodriguez-Artalejo F, Hu FB. The relationship of coffee consumption with mortality. Ann Intern Med 2008; 148: 904914.
  • 2
    Ruhl CE, Everhart JE. Coffee and caffeine consumption reduce the risk of elevated serum alanine aminotransferase activity in the United States. Gastroenterology 2005; 128: 2432.
  • 3
    Ruhl CE, Everhart JE. Coffee and tea consumption are associated with a lower incidence of chronic liver disease in the United States. Gastroenterology 2005; 129: 19281936.
  • 4
    Klatsky AL, Morton C, Udaltsova N, Friedman GD. Coffee, cirrhosis, and transaminase enzymes. Arch Intern Med 2006; 166: 11901195.
  • 5
    Tanaka K, Tokunaga S, Kono S, Tokudome S, Akamatsu T, Moriyama T, et al. Coffee consumption and decreased serum gamma-glutamyltransferase and aminotransferase activities among male alcohol drinkers. Int J Epidemiol 1998; 27: 438443.
  • 6
    Casiglia E, Spolaore P, Ginocchio G, Ambrosio GB. Unexpected effects of coffee consumption on liver enzymes. Eur J Epidemiol 1993; 9: 293297.
  • 7
    Kono S, Shinchi K, Imanishi K, Todoroki I, Hatsuse K. Coffee and serum gamma-glutamyltransferase: a study of self-defense officials in Japan. Am J Epidemiol 1994; 139: 723727.
  • 8
    Honjo S, Kono S, Coleman MP, Shinchi K, Sakurai Y, Todoroki I, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=Search&Term=%22Umeda%20T%22%5BAuthor%5D&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPluset al. Coffee drinking and serum gamma-glutamyltransferase: an extended study of Self-Defense Officials of Japan. Ann Epidemiol 1999;9:325–331.
  • 9
    Honjo S, Kono S, Coleman MP, Shinchi K, Sakurai Y, Todoroki I, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=Search&Term=%22Umeda%20T%22%5BAuthor%5D&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPlus et al. Coffee consumption and serum aminotransferases in middle-aged Japanese men. J Clin Epidemiol 2001;54:823–829.
  • 10
    Corrao G, Zambon A, Bagnardi V, D'Amicis A, Klatsky A. Coffee, caffeine, and the risk of liver cirrhosis. Ann Epidemiol 2001; 11: 458465.
  • 11
    Tverdal A, Skurtveit S. Coffee intake and mortality from liver cirrhosis. Ann Epidemiol 2003; 13: 419423.
  • 12
    Gelatti U, Covolo L, Franceschini M, Pirali F, Tagger A, Ribero ML, et al. Coffee consumption reduces the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma independently of its aetiology: a case-control study. J Hepatol 2005; 42: 528534.
  • 13
    Inoue M, Yoshimi I, Sobue T, Tsugane S. Influence of coffee drinking on subsequent risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a prospective study in Japan. J Natl Cancer Inst 2005; 97: 293300.
  • 14
    Shimazu T, Tsubono Y, Kuriyama S, Ohmori K, Koizumi Y, Nishino Y, et al. Coffee consumption and the risk of primary liver cancer: pooled analysis of two prospective studies in Japan. Int J Cancer 2005; 116: 150154.
  • 15
    Gallus S, Bertuzzi M, Tavani A, Bosetti C, Negri E, La Vecchia C, et al. Does coffee protect against hepatocellular carcinoma? Br J Cancer 2002; 87: 956959.
  • 16
    Bravi F, Bosetti C, Tavani A, Bagnardi V, Gallus S, Negri E, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=Search&Term=%22Franceschi%20S%22%5BAuthor%5D&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPluset al. Coffee drinking and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis. HEPATOLOGY 2007;46:430–435.
  • 17
    Larsson SC, Wolk A. Coffee consumption and risk of liver cancer: a meta-analysis. Gastroenterology 2007; 132: 17401745.
  • 18
    Ishak K, Baptista A, Bianchi L, Callea F, De Groote J, Gudat F, et al. Histological grading and staging of chronic hepatitis. J Hepatol 1995; 22: 696699.
  • 19
    Michels KB, Willett WC, Fuchs CS, Giovannucci E. Coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption and incidence of colon and rectal cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 2005; 97: 282292.
  • 20
    Iso H, Date C, Wakai K, Fukui M, Tamakoshi A. The relationship between green tea and total caffeine intake and risk for self-reported type 2 diabetes among Japanese adults. Ann Intern Med 2006; 144: 554562.
  • 21
    National Toxicology Program. Caffeine. Available at: http://cerhr.niehs.nih.gov/common/caffeine.html.
  • 22
    Shimbo M, Nakamura K, Jing Shi H, Kizuki M, Seino K, Inose T, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=Search&Term=%22Takano%20T%22%5BAuthor%5D&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPluset al. Green tea consumption in everyday life and mental health. Public Health Nutr 2005;8:1300–1306.
  • 23
    Barone JJ, Roberts HR. Caffeine consumption. Food Chem Toxicol 1996; 34: 119129.
  • 24
    Allen M, Yen W. Introduction to measurement theory: Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press; 2002.
  • 25
    Higgins LG, Cavin C, Itoh K, Yamamoto M, Hayes JD. Induction of cancer chemopreventive enzymes by coffee is mediated by transcription factor Nrf2: evidence that the coffee-specific diterpenes cafestol and kahweol confer protection against acrolein. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol 2008; 226: 328337.
  • 26
    Huber WW, Rossmanith W, Grusch M, Haslinger E, Prustomersky S, Peter-Vörösmarty B, et al. Effects of coffee and its chemopreventive components kahweol and cafestol on cytochrome P450 and sulfotransferase in rat liver. Food Chem Toxicol 2008; 46: 12301238.
  • 27
    Cavin C, Marin-Kuan M, Langouet S, Bezençon C, Guignard G, Verguet C, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=Search&Term=%22Piguet%20D%22%5BAuthor%5D&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPluset al. Induction of Nrf2-mediated cellular defenses and alteration of phase I activities as mechanisms of chemoprotective effects of coffee in the liver. Food Chem Toxicol 2008;46:1239–1248.
  • 28
    Majer BJ, Hofer E, Cavin C, Lhoste E, Uhl M, Glatt HR, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?Db=pubmed&Cmd=Search&Term=%22Meinl%20W%22%5BAuthor%5D&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsPanel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_RVAbstractPluset al. Coffee diterpenes prevent the genotoxic effects of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and N-nitrosodimethylamine in a human derived liver cell line (HepG2). Food Chem Toxicol 2005;43:433–441.
  • 29
    Lee KJ, Choi JH, Jeong HG. Hepatoprotective and antioxidant effects of the coffee diterpenes kahweol and cafestol on carbon tetrachloride-induced liver damage in mice. Food Chem Toxicol 2007; 45: 21182125.
  • 30
    Gressner OA, Lahme B, Rehbein K, Siluschek M, Weiskirchen R, Gressner AM. Pharmacological application of caffeine inhibits TGF-beta-stimulated connective tissue growth factor expression in hepatocytes via PPARgamma and SMAD2/3-dependent pathways. J Hepatol 2008; 49: 758767.