Meeting vaccination quality measures for hepatitis A and B virus in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection

Authors

  • Jennifer R. Kramer,

    Corresponding author
    1. Houston VA Health Services Research #38; Development Center of Excellence, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX
    2. Health Services Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
    • 2002 Holcombe Boulevard (152), Houston, TX 77030
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  • Christine Y. Hachem,

    1. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
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  • Fasiha Kanwal,

    1. John Cochran VA Medical Center, St. Louis, MO
    2. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
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  • Minghua Mei,

    1. Houston VA Health Services Research #38; Development Center of Excellence, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX
    2. Health Services Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
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  • Hashem B. El-Serag

    1. Houston VA Health Services Research #38; Development Center of Excellence, Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, TX
    2. Health Services Research, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
    3. Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX
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  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Abstract

Coinfection with hepatitis A virus (HAV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services has identified HAV and HBV vaccination as a priority area for quality measurement in HCV. It is unclear to what extent patients with HCV meet these recommendations. We used national data from the Department of Veterans Affairs HCV Clinical Case Registry to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of meeting the quality measure (QM) of receiving vaccination or documented immunity to HAV and HBV in patients with chronic HCV. We identified 88,456 patients who had overall vaccination rates of 21.9% and 20.7% for HBV and HAV, respectively. The QM rates were 57.0% and 45.5% for HBV and HAV, respectively. Patients who were nonwhite or who had elevated alanine aminotransferase levels, cirrhosis, or human immunodeficiency virus were more likely to meet the HBV QM. Factors related to HCV care were also determinants of meeting the HBV QM. These factors included receiving a specialist consult, genotype testing, or HCV treatment. Patients who were older, had psychosis, and had a higher comorbidity score were less likely to meet the HBV QM. With a few exceptions, similar variables were related to meeting the HAV QM. The incidence of superinfection with acute HBV and HAV was low, but it was significantly lower in patients who received vaccination than in those who did not. Conclusion: Quality measure rates for HAV and HBV are suboptimal for patients with chronic HCV. In addition, several patient-related factors and receiving HCV-related care are associated with a higher likelihood of meeting QMs. (HEPATOLOGY 2011)

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