Inflammation-induced hepatocellular carcinoma is dependent on CCR5 in mice

Authors


  • Potential conflict of interest: Nothing to report.

Address reprint requests to: Amnon Peled, Ph.D., Gene Therapy Institute, Hadassah University Hospital, P.O. Box 12000, Jerusalem 91120, Israel. E-mail: peled@hadassah.org.il; fax: +972-2-6430982.

Abstract

Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an inflammation-induced cancer, which is the third-leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. We investigated the role of the chemokine receptors, CCR5 and CCR1, in regulating inflammation and tumorigenesis in an inflammation-induced HCC model in mice. Multidrug resistance 2 gene (Mdr2)-knockout (Mdr2-KO) mice spontaneously develop chronic cholestatic hepatitis and fibrosis that is eventually followed by HCC. We generated two new strains from the Mdr2-KO mouse, the Mdr2:CCR5 and the Mdr2:CCR1 double knockouts (DKOs), and set out to compare inflammation and tumorigenesis among these strains. We found that in Mdr2-KO mice lacking the chemokine receptor, CCR5 (Mdr2:CCR5 DKO mice), but not CCR1 (Mdr2:CCR1 DKO), macrophage recruitment and trafficking to the liver was significantly reduced. Furthermore, in the absence of CCR5, reduced inflammation was also associated with reduced periductal accumulation of CD24+ oval cells and abrogation of fibrosis. DKO mice for Mdr2 and CCR5 exhibited a significant decrease in tumor incidence and size. Conclusions: Our results indicate that CCR5 has a critical role in both the development and progression of liver cancer. Therefore, we propose that a CCR5 antagonist can serve for HCC cancer prevention and treatment. (Hepatology 2013;53:1021–1030)

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