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In the article by Gil-Alzugaray et al., “Prognostic Factors and Prevention of Radioembolization-Induced Liver Disease” (Hepatology, 2013;57:1078-1087), the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval (CI) for selective treatment in the univariate analysis of cirrhosis patients was reported in Table 5 as 4.98 (1.40-17.6) but it was actually 0.01 (0.05-0.71).

This error lead to erroneously identifying in the original Results section (p. 1083) selective treatment instead of whole-liver treatment as a predictive factor for REILD among cirrhosis patients. The paragraph reads:

“Cirrhosis patients more likely to develop REILD were those with small livers (total volume <1.5 L), an abnormal bilirubin at baseline (>1.2 mg/dL), hypersplenism (platelets <100/pL), treated in a selective fashion, not receiving steroids or ursodeoxycholic acid, or treated by the standard protocol. In the corresponding multivariate model, only the presence of a small liver, an abnormal bilirubin, and treatment in a selective fashion were independently associated to the development of REILD. The reason for this apparent contradiction may be that treatment was more intense when delivered in a selective rather than in a whole-liver fashion (average activity relative to target volume: 1.79 GBq/L versus 0.92 GBq/L, P = 0.002).”

And it should read:

“Cirrhosis patients more likely to develop REILD were those with small livers (total volume <1.5 L), an abnormal bilirubin at baseline (>1.2 mg/dL), hypersplenism (platelets <100/pL), treated in a whole-liver fashion, not receiving steroids or ursodeoxycholic acid, or treated by the standard protocol. In the corresponding multivariate model, only the presence of a small liver, an abnormal bilirubin, and treatment in a whole-liver fashion were independently associated to the development of REILD. This occurs even though treatment was more intense when delivered in a selective rather than in a whole-liver fashion (average activity relative to target volume: 1.79 GBq/L versus 0.92 GBq/L, P = 0.002).”