Hepatic cytochrome P450 2E1 is increased in patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

Authors

  • Martin D. Weltman,

    1. Storr Liver Unit, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Sydney at Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
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    • Dr. Weltman is the recipient of an Australian National Health and Medical Research Council Postgraduate Medical Scholarship. Dr. Farrell is the Robert W. Storr Professor of Hepatic Medicine at the Postgraduate Medical Foundation, University of Sydney.

  • Geoffrey C. Farrell,

    Corresponding author
    1. Storr Liver Unit, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Sydney at Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
    • Storr Liver Unit, Department of Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Westmead 2145, Australia. Fax: 61-2-9635-7582
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  • Pauline Hall,

    1. Department of Histopathology, Flinders Medical Centre, Adelaide, SA, Australia
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  • Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg,

    1. Department of Physiological Biochemistry, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Christopher Liddle

    1. Department of Clinical Pharmacology, University of Sydney at Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia
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Abstract

Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) has multiple etiologic associations, but the pathogenesis is poorly understood. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 is induced in the liver of patients who drink alcohol to excess and is important in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). We have previously shown that hepatic CYP2E1 is also increased in a rat dietary model of steatohepatitis. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that hepatic CYP2E1 is induced in the liver of patients with NASH, defined on the basis of compatible liver histology and the exclusion of excessive alcohol intake. Sections of paraffin-embedded liver biopsy material from 31 subjects with NASH were evaluated and compared with sections from 10 histologically normal livers and 6 patients with ALD. Hepatic CYP2E1 and CYP3A were detected in liver sections by immunohistochemistry using specific anti-human CYP2E1 and CYP3A antibodies. As expected, normal livers showed CYP2E1 immunostaining confined to a rim, two to three cells thick, around terminal hepatic venule, while livers from alcoholic hepatitis patients showed increased CYP2E1 staining. CYP2E1 immunostaining was also increased in livers from patients with NASH, irrespective of the etiologic association. Further, the pattern of CYP2E1 distribution was similar to ALD, with increased perivenular intensity and more extensive acinar distribution of staining. As in the rat model, the hepatic distribution of CYP2E1 corresponded to that of steatosis. In contrast to CYP2E1, CYP3A immunostaining was decreased in patients with NASH. We conclude that hepatic CYP2E1 is increased in patients with NASH compared with normal livers. Thus, despite many possible etiologic factors for NASH, the pathogenetic mechanisms may be similar and, like alcoholic steatohepatitis, may involve induction of CYP2E1.

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