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Hippocampal volumetrics in treatment-resistant depression and schizophrenia: The devil's in De-Tail

Authors

  • Jerome J. Maller,

    Corresponding author
    1. Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Melbourne Victoria, Australia
    • Research Fellow, Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University Department of Psychological Medicine, Level 1—Old Baker Building PO Box 315 Prahran 3181, Commercial Road Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Zafiris J. Daskalakis,

    1. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Canada
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  • Richard H.S. Thomson,

    1. Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Melbourne Victoria, Australia
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  • Melissa Daigle,

    1. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Canada
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  • Mera S. Barr,

    1. Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, University of Toronto, Canada
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  • Paul B. Fitzgerald

    1. Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, The Alfred and Monash University School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Melbourne Victoria, Australia
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  • The authors declare that they have no competing financial interests.

Abstract

Studies of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and schizophrenia (SCH) have revealed reduced hippocampal volumes, but findings have been inconsistent due to sample and measurement differences. The current study sought to measure this structure in a large sample of MDD, SCH, and healthy subjects, using a strict measurement protocol, to elucidate morphological-specific volumetric differences. Patients with treatment-resistant MDD (N = 182) and treatment-resistant SCH with auditory-verbal hallucinations (N = 52), and healthy controls (N = 76) underwent psychiatric assessments and brain MRI. The findings indicate that (1) MDD and SCH patients have reduced total hippocampal volume which was marked in the tails (more so in patients with MDD), (2) region of interest estimation protocols and sample characteristics may help explain volumetric differences between previous SCH studies. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., Inc.

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