Assessing recollection and familiarity of similar lures in a behavioral pattern separation task

Authors

  • Jennifer Kim,

    1. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
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  • Michael A. Yassa

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218
    • Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Ames Hall 216A, Baltimore, MD 21218
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  • This article was published online on 8 FEB 2013. An error was subsequently identified. This notice is included in the online and print versions to indicate that both have been corrected on 6 March 2013.

Abstract

The relationship between recollection-mediated recognition memory and behavioral pattern separation is poorly understood. In two separate experiments, we modified a well-validated object discrimination task with previously demonstrated sensitivity to neural pattern separation with instructions to assess recollection and familiarity. In the first experiment, we included a Remember/Know (R/K) judgment, and in the second we included a source memory judgment. We found that both “Remember” and correct source judgments were higher for lures labeled “similar” (where pattern separation is engaged) but also higher on lures called “old” (where pattern separation is absent), suggesting that false alarms in pattern separation tasks are frequently mediated by recollection. As one might expect, “Remember” judgments and correct source decisions increased with greater dissimilarity for “similar” responses and increased with greater similarity for “old” responses. This suggests that recollection can occur in the presence and in the absence of pattern separation and that false alarms to similar lures are not simply driven by familiarity. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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