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On the role of retrosplenial cortex in long-lasting memory storage

Authors

  • Cynthia Katche,

    1. Instituto de Biologia Celular y Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, UBA, Paraguay 2155, 3 piso, Buenos Aires 1121ABG, Argentina
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  • Guido Dorman,

    1. Instituto de Biologia Celular y Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, UBA, Paraguay 2155, 3 piso, Buenos Aires 1121ABG, Argentina
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  • Carolina Gonzalez,

    1. Instituto de Biologia Celular y Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, UBA, Paraguay 2155, 3 piso, Buenos Aires 1121ABG, Argentina
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  • Cecilia P. Kramar,

    1. Instituto de Biologia Celular y Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, UBA, Paraguay 2155, 3 piso, Buenos Aires 1121ABG, Argentina
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  • Leandro Slipczuk,

    1. Department of Medicine, Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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  • Janine I. Rossato,

    1. Laboratorio de Neurobiologia do Comportamento, Instituto de Pesquisas Biomedicas, PUCRS, Av. Ipiranga 6690, RS90610-000 Porto Alegre, Brasil
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  • Martin Cammarota,

    1. Laboratorio de Neurobiologia do Comportamento, Instituto de Pesquisas Biomedicas, PUCRS, Av. Ipiranga 6690, RS90610-000 Porto Alegre, Brasil
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  • Jorge H. Medina

    Corresponding author
    1. Instituto de Biologia Celular y Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, UBA, Paraguay 2155, 3 piso, Buenos Aires 1121ABG, Argentina
    2. Departamento de Fisiologia, Facultad de Medicina, UBA, Paraguay 2155, 7 piso, Buenos Aires 1121ABG, Argentina
    • Instituto de Biología Celular y Neurociencias, Facultad de Medicina, Paraguay 2155, 3rd floor, C1121ABG Buenos Aires, Argentina
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Abstract

The retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is involved in a range of cognitive functions. However, its precise involvement in memory processing is unknown. Pharmacological and behavioral experiments demonstrate that protein synthesis and c-Fos expression in the anterior part of RSC (aRSC) are necessary late after training to maintain for many days a fear-motivated memory. Long-lasting memory storage is regulated by D1/D5 dopamine receptors in aRSC and depends on the functional interplay between dorsal hippocampus and aRSC. These results suggest that the RSC recapitulates some of the molecular events that occur in the hippocampus to maintain memory trace over time. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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