Preferences for physician services in Ukraine: a discrete choice experiment

Authors

  • Andriy Danyliv,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Public Health, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kyiv, Ukraine
    2. Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands
    • Correspondence to: A. Danyliv, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, School of Public Health; Maastricht University, Department of Health Services Research: Focusing on Chronic Care and Ageing, CAPHRI. E-mail: danyliv@gmail.com

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  • Milena Pavlova,

    1. Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands
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  • Irena Gryga,

    1. School of Public Health, National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy, Kyiv, Ukraine
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  • Wim Groot

    1. Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht University, Maastricht, Netherlands
    2. Top Institute Evidence-Based Education Research (TIER), Maastricht, Netherlands
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Summary

Evidence on preferences of Ukrainian consumers for healthcare improvements can help to design reforms that correspond to societal priorities. This study aims to elicit and to place monetary values on public preferences for out-patient physician services in Ukraine. The method of discrete choice experiment is used on a sample of 303 respondents, representative of the adult Ukrainian population. The random effect logit model with interactions provides the best fit for the data and is used to calculate the marginal willingness to pay (MWTP) for quality and access improvements. At a sample level, there is no clear preference to pay formally rather than informally or vice versa. We also do not find that visiting a general practitioner is preferred over direct access to a medical specialist. However, there are differences between population groups. Quality-related attributes of physician services appear important to respondents, especially the attitude of medical staff. Thus, interpersonal aspects of out-patient care should be given priority in decisions about investments in quality improvements. Other aspects, that is social quality and access, are important as well but their improvement brings fewer social gains. Measures should be taken to eradicate the informal payment channels and to strengthen the gate-keeping role of primary care. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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