dbHCCvar: A comprehensive database of human genetic variations in hepatocellular carcinoma

Authors

  • Xiao-Jia Yu,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These two authors should be considered as co-first authors.

  • Fang Fang,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
    • These two authors should be considered as co-first authors.

  • Chun-Lei Tang,

    1. School of Computer Science and Technology, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lei Yao,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lu Yu,

    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Long Yu

    Corresponding author
    1. State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
    • State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, Institute of Genetics, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, 200433 Shanghai, People's Republic of China.
    Search for more papers by this author

  • Communicated by Mark H. Paalman

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with a high mortality rate. The complete pathogenesis of HCC is not completely understood, and highly efficient therapy is still unavailable. In the past several decades, various genetic variations such as mutations and polymorphisms have been reported to be associated with HCC risk, progression, survival, and recurrence. However, to our knowledge, these genetic variations have not been comprehensively and systematically compiled. In this study we constructed dbHCCvar, a free online database of human genetic variations in HCC. Eligible publications were collected from PubMed, and detailed information and major research data from each eligible study were then extracted and recorded in our database. As a result, dbHCCvar contains almost all human genetic variations reported to be associated or not associated with HCC risk, clinical pathology, drug reaction, survival, or recurrence to date. It is expected that dbHCCvar will function as a useful tool for researchers to facilitate the search and identification of new genetic markers for HCC. dbHCCvar is free for all visitors at http://GenetMed.fudan.edu.cn/dbHCCvar. 32:E2308–E2316, 2011. ©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Ancillary