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The effect of multivitamin supplementation on mood and stress in healthy older men

Authors

  • Elizabeth Harris,

    1. Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM) Collaborative Centre for Neurocognition, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Joni Kirk,

    1. Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM) Collaborative Centre for Neurocognition, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Renee Rowsell,

    1. Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM) Collaborative Centre for Neurocognition, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Luis Vitetta,

    1. Centre for Integrative Clinical and Molecular Medicine and NICM Collaborative Centre for Transitional Preclinical and Clinical Research in Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicines, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    2. Centres for Health Research, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    3. National Institute of Integrative Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Avni Sali,

    1. Centre for Integrative Clinical and Molecular Medicine and NICM Collaborative Centre for Transitional Preclinical and Clinical Research in Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicines, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    2. Centres for Health Research, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
    3. National Institute of Integrative Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Andrew B Scholey,

    1. Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM) Collaborative Centre for Neurocognition, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Andrew Pipingas

    Corresponding author
    • Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM) Collaborative Centre for Neurocognition, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
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  • Research was conducted at the Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, National Institute of Complementary Medicine (NICM) Collaborative Centre for Neurocognition, Swinburne University, Melbourne, VIC 3122, Australia.

A. Pipingas, Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University of Technology P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Vic, 3122, Australia. Tel: +613 92145215; Fax +613 9214 8912. E-mail: apipingas@swin.edu.au

Abstract

Objective

There is a demonstrated association between poor mood and deficiency in several micronutrients. Multivitamin supplements contain a wide range of nutrients, suggesting that they may be effective in improving mood; however, few studies have investigated this potential in randomized, controlled trials. This study investigates the effects of a multivitamin, mineral, and herbal supplement on mood and stress in a group of healthy, older male volunteers.

Methods

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, fifty men, aged 50–69 years, supplemented for a period of 8 weeks with a multivitamin formulation that contained vitamins (at levels above recommended daily intakes), minerals, antioxidants, and herbal extracts, or a placebo. They completed a series of mood and stress questionnaires at baseline and post-supplementation.

Results

Compared with placebo, there was a significant reduction in the overall score on a depression anxiety and stress scale and an improvement in alertness and general daily functioning in the multivitamin group.

Conclusions

Supplementation with a multivitamin, mineral and herbal formulation may be useful in improving alertness and reducing negative mood symptoms and may also improve feelings of general day-to-day well-being. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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