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Performance of a conceptual and physically based model in simulating the response of a semi-urbanized watershed in San Antonio, Texas

Authors

  • Almoutaz A. El Hassan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
    • Correspondence to: Almoutaz A. EL Hassan, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA

      E-mail: almoutaz@gmail.com

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  • H. O. Sharif,

    1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Terrance Jackson,

    1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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  • Singaiah Chintalapudi

    1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA
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Abstract

The need for accurate hydrologic analysis and rainfall–runoff modelling tools has been rapidly increasing because of the growing complexity of operational hydrologic and hydraulic problems associated with population growth, rapid urbanization and expansion of agricultural activities. Given the recent advances in remote sensing of physiographic features and the availability of near real-time precipitation products, rainfall–runoff models are expected to predict runoff more accurately. In this study, we compare the performance and implementation requirements of two rainfall–runoff models for a semi-urbanized watershed. One is a semi-distributed conceptual model, the Hydrologic Engineering Center-Hydrologic Modelling System (HEC-HMS). The other is a physically based, distributed-parameter hydrologic model, the Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA). Four flood events that took place on the Leon Creek watershed, a sub-watershed of the San Antonio River basin in Texas, were used in this study. The two models were driven by the Multisensor Precipitation Estimator radar products. One event (in 2007) was used for HEC-HMS and GSSHA calibrations. Two events (in 2004 and 2007) were used for further calibration of HEC-HMS. Three events (in 2002, 2004 and 2010) were used for model validation. In general, the physically based, distributed-parameter model performed better than the conceptual model and required less calibration. The two models were prepared with the same minimum required input data, and the effort required to build the two models did not differ substantially. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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