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The responses of hydrological processes and sediment yield to land-use and climate change in the Be River Catchment, Vietnam

Authors

  • Dao Nguyen Khoi,

    Corresponding author
    1. Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Yamanashi, Japan
    2. Faculty of Environmental Science, University of Science, Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    • Correspondence to: Dao Nguyen Khoi, Faculty of Environmental Science, University of Science, Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City, 227 Nguyen Van Cu, Dist. 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

      E-mail: dnkhoi86@gmail.com

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  • Tadashi Suetsugi

    1. Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Yamanashi, Japan
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Abstract

In this study, we investigated the responses of hydrology and sediment yield with impacts of land-use and climate change scenarios in the Be River Catchment, using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) hydrological model. The calibration and validation results indicated that the SWAT model is a powerful tool for simulating the impact of environmental change on hydrology and sediment yield in this catchment. The hydrologic and sediment yield responses to land-use and climate changes were simulated based on the calibrated model. The results indicated that a 16.3% decrease in forest land is likely to increase streamflow (0.2 to 0.4%), sediment load (1.8 to 3.0%), and surface runoff (SURQ) (4.8 to 10.7%) and to decrease groundwater discharge (GW_Q) (3.5 to 7.9%). Climate change in the catchment leads to decreases in streamflow (0.7 to 6.9%) and GW_Q (3.0 to 8.4%), increase in evapotranspiration (0.5 to 2.9%), and changes in SURQ (−5.3 to 2.3%) and sediment load (−5.3 to 4.4%). The combined impacts of land-use and climate changes decrease streamflow (2.0 to 3.9%) and GW_Q (12.3 to 14.0%), increase evapotranspiration (0.7 to 2.8%), SURQ (8.2 to 12.4%), and sediment load (2.0 to 7.9%). In general, the separate impacts of climate and land-use changes on streamflow, sediment load, and water balance components are offset each other. However, SURQ and some component of subsurface flow are more sensitive to land-use change than to climate change. Furthermore, the results emphasized water scarcity during the dry season and increased soil erosion during the wet season. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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