The integration of ecological risk assessment and structured decision making into watershed management

Authors

  • Dan W Ohlson,

    Corresponding author
    1. Compass Resource Management, 200–1260 Hamilton Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B2S8, Canada
    • Compass Resource Management, 200–1260 Hamilton Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B2S8, Canada
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  • Victor B Serveiss

    1. US Environmental Protection Agency (8623-N), Office of Research and Development, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460
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Abstract

Watershed management processes continue to call for more science and improved decision making that take into account the full range of stakeholder perspectives. Increasingly, the core principles of ecological risk assessment (i.e., the development and use of assessment endpoints and conceptual models, conducting exposure and effects analysis) are being incorporated and adapted in innovative ways to meet the call for more science. Similarly, innovative approaches to adapting decision analysis tools and methods for incorporating stakeholder concerns in complex natural resource management decisions are being increasingly applied. Here, we present an example of the integration of ecological risk assessment with decision analysis in the development of a watershed management plan for the Greater Vancouver Water District in British Columbia, Canada. Assessment endpoints were developed, ecological inventory data were collected, and watershed models were developed to characterize the existing and future condition of 3 watersheds in terms of the potential risks to water quality. Stressors to water quality include sedimentation processes (landslides, streambank erosion) and forest disturbance (wildfire, major insect or disease outbreak). Three landscape-level risk management alternatives were developed to reflect different degrees of management intervention. Each alternative was evaluated under different scenarios and analyzed by explicitly examining value-based trade-offs among water quality, environmental, financial, and social endpoints. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate how the integration of ecological risk assessment and decision analysis approaches can support decision makers in watershed management.

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