Cigarette smoking and subsequent risk of lung cancer by histologic type in middle-aged Japanese men and women: The JPHC study

Authors

  • Tomotaka Sobue,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cancer Information and Epidemiology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan
    • Cancer Information and Epidemiology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan
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    • Fax: +81-3-3248-1553

  • Seiichiro Yamamoto,

    1. Cancer Information and Epidemiology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan
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  • Megumi Hara,

    1. Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute East, Chiba, Japan
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  • Shizuka Sasazuki,

    1. Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute East, Chiba, Japan
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  • Satoshi Sasaki,

    1. Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute East, Chiba, Japan
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  • Shoichiro Tsugane,

    1. Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute East, Chiba, Japan
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  • for the JPHC Study Group

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    • The investigators and participating institutions in the Japan Public Health Center-based prospective study on cancer and cardiovascular diseases (JPHC) Study Group include the authors listed above, as well as: J. Ogata, S. Baba, National Cardiovascular Center, Suita; K. Miyakawa, F. Saito, A. Koizumi, Y. Sano, Iwate Prefectural Ninohe Public Health Center, Ninohe; Y. Miyajima, N. Suzuki, S. Nagasawa, Y. Furusugi, Akita Prefectural Yokote Public Health Center, Yokote; H. Sanada, Y. Hatayama, F. Kobayashi, H. Uchino, Y. Shirai, T. Kondo, R. Sasaki, Nagano Prefectural Saku Public Health Center, Saku; Y. Kishimoto, E. Tanaka, M. Kinjo, T. Fukuyama, Okinawa Prefectural Ishikawa Public Health Center, Ishikawa; K. Imoto, H. Yazawa, T. Seo, A. Seiko, F. Ito, Katsushika Public Health Center, Tokyo; A. Murata, K. Minato, K. Motegi, T. Fujieda, Ibaraki Prefectural Mito Public Health Center, Mito; K. Matsui, T. Abe, Niigata Prefectural Kashiwazaki Public Health Center, Kashiwazaki; M. Doi, Y. Ishikawa, A. Terao, Kochi Prefectural Chuo-higashi Public Health Center, Tosayamada; H. Sueta, H. Doi, M. Urata, Nagasaki Prefectural Kamigoto Public Health Center, Arikawa; H. Sakiyama, N. Onga, H. Takaesu, Okinawa Prefectural Miyako Public Health Center, Hirara; F. Horii, I. Asano, H. Yamaguchi, K. Aoki, S. Maruyama, Osaka Prefectural Suita Public Health Center, Suita; S. Matsushima, S. Natsukawa, Saku General Hospital, Usuda; S. Watanabe, M. Akabane, Tokyo University of Agriculture, Tokyo; M. Konishi, Ehime University, Matsuyama; H. Iso, Tsukuba University, Tsukuba; H. Sugimura, Hamamatsu University, Hamamatsu; Y. Tsubono, Tohoku University, Sendai; N. Kabuto, National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba; S. Tominaga, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya; M. Iida, S. Sato, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka; the late M. Yamaguchi, Y. Matsumura, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, Tokyo.


Abstract

In order to update the findings of relative risk associated with cigarette smoking for lung cancer by histologic type in Japan, the data from a population-based cohort study of 91,738 men and women were analyzed. During 1990–1999, 422 lung cancer incident cases were identified. The relative risk for all incident cases associated with current smokers versus non-smokers was 4.5 [95% confidence interval (CI): 3.0–6.8] and 4.2 (95% CI: 2.4–7.2), for men and women, respectively. When divided by histologic type, relative risk for squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma was 12.7 (95% CI: 4.7–34.7) and 17.5 (95% CI: 4.9–62.1), while for adenocarcinoma it was 2.8 (95% CI: 1.6–4.9) and 2.0 (95% CI: 0.8–5.0) for men and women, respectively. We confirmed that the lung cancer risk in men rose with increasing cigarette smoking, especially the duration of smoking among current smokers and decreased after the cessation of smoking among former smokers. Unlike the US or European countries, the relative risk did not increase in this updated study, compared with previous studies in 1960s to 1990s in Japan either for all incident cases or for specific histologic types and the magnitude of relative risks was substantially lower than that observed in the US or European countries, especially for adenocarcinoma. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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