Circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of ovarian cancer

Authors

  • Annekatrin Lukanova,

    1. Hormones and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
    2. Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, Sweden
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  • Eva Lundin,

    1. Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, Sweden
    2. Department of Medical Biosciences/Pathology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
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  • Paolo Toniolo,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
    2. Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, USA
    3. Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
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  • Andrea Micheli,

    1. Unit of Epidemiology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy
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  • Arslan Akhmedkhanov,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
    2. Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, USA
    3. Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
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  • Sabina Rinaldi,

    1. Hormones and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
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  • Paola Muti,

    1. Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, New York, USA
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  • Per Lenner,

    1. Department of Oncology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden
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  • Carine Biessy,

    1. Hormones and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
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  • Vittorio Krogh,

    1. Unit of Epidemiology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy
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  • Anne Zeleniuch-Jacquotte,

    1. Kaplan Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, USA
    2. Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA
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  • Franco Berrino,

    1. Unit of Epidemiology, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy
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  • Göran Hallmans,

    1. Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, Sweden
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  • Elio Riboli,

    1. Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
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  • Rudolf Kaaks

    Corresponding author
    1. Hormones and Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France
    • Hormones & Cancer Group, International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 Cours Albert Thomas 69372 Lyon, France
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    • Fax: +33-4-72-73-85-53


  • The contents of this article are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Cancer Institute.

Abstract

Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, a mitogenic and anti-apoptotic peptide, has been implicated in the development of several cancers. We hypothesized that high circulating IGF-I concentrations may be associated with an increased risk of ovarian cancer. A case–control study was nested within 3 prospective cohorts in New York (USA), Umeå (Sweden) and Milan (Italy). One hundred thirty-two women with primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancer diagnosed at least 1 year after blood donation were case subjects. For each case, 2 control subjects were selected, matching the case subject on cohort, menopausal status, age and date of recruitment (n = 263). Only women who did not use exogenous hormones at blood donation were included in the study. There was no association between IGF-I concentrations and ovarian cancer risk in the study group as a whole. In analyses restricted to subjects who had developed ovarian cancer at a young age (<55), circulating IGF-I was directly and strongly associated with ovarian cancer risk (OR = 4.97; 95% CI = 1.22–20.2 for the top vs. the bottom IGF-I tertile after adjustment for parity, BMI categories and smoking). There was no significant association of IGF binding protein-3 with ovarian cancer risk. We found a strong direct relationship between circulating IGF-I levels and risk of developing ovarian cancer before age 55. Additional, larger studies of this association are needed to provide more precise estimates of effect. © 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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