SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

REFERENCES

  • 1
    Rousseau MC, Trevisan A, Villa L, Rohan T, Franco E. Viral load as a predictor of HPV infection persistence among women in the Ludwig-McGill cohort study in Sao Paulo, Brazil. In: Proceedings of the 19th International Papillomavirus Conference, Florianopolis, Sept. 27, 2001.
  • 2
    Cuzick J. Viral load as a surrogate for persistence in cervical human papillomavirus infection. In: FrancoE, MonsonegoJ, eds. New developments in cervical cancer screening and prevention. Oxford: Blackwell, 1997. 3738.
  • 3
    Ylitalo N, Sorensen P, Josefsson AM, Magnusson PK, Andersen PK, Ponten J, Adami HO, Gyllensten UB, Melbye M. Consistent high viral load of human papillomavirus 16 and risk of cervical carcinoma in situ: a nested case-control study. Lancet 2000; 355: 21948.
  • 4
    Josefsson AM, Magnusson PK, Ylitalo N, Sorensen P, Qwarforth-Tubbin P, Andersen PK, Melbye M, Adami HO, Gyllensten UB. Viral load of human papilloma virus 16 as a determinant for development of cervical carcinoma in situ: a nested case-control study. Lancet 2000; 355: 218993.
  • 5
    Sherman ME, Schiffman M, Cox JT. Effects of age and human papilloma viral load on colposcopy triage: data from the Randomized Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance/Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion Triage Study (ALTS). J Natl Cancer Inst 2002; 94: 1027.
  • 6
    Ho GY, Burk RD, Klein S, Kadish AS, Chang CJ, Palan P, Basu J, Tachezy R, Lewis R, Romney S. Persistent genital human papillomavirus infection as a risk factor for persistent cervical dysplasia. J Natl Cancer Inst 1995; 87: 136571.
  • 7
    Ho GY, Palan PR, Basu J, Romney SL, Kadish AS, Mikhail M, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Runowicz C, Burk RD. Viral characteristics of human papillomavirus infection and antioxidant levels as risk factors for cervical dysplasia. Int J Cancer 1998; 78: 5949.
  • 8
    Clavel C, Masure M, Bory JP, Putaud I, Mangeonjean C, Lorenzato M, Nazeyrollas P, Gabriel R, Quereux C, Birembaut P. Human papillomavirus testing in primary screening for the detection of high-grade cervical lesions: a study of 7932 women. Br J Cancer 2001; 84: 161623.
  • 9
    Cox JT, Lorincz AT, Schiffman MH, Sherman ME, Cullen A, Kurman RJ. Human papillomavirus testing by hybrid capture appears to be useful in triaging women with a cytologic diagnosis of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance. Am J Obstet Gynecol 1995; 172: 94654.
  • 10
    Hall S, Lorincz A, Shah F, Sherman ME, Abbas F, Paull G, Kurman RJ, Shah KV. Human papillomavirus DNA detection in cervical specimens by hybrid capture: correlation with cytologic and histologic diagnoses of squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix. Gynecol Oncol 1996; 62: 3539.
  • 11
    Cuzick J, Terry G, Ho L, Hollingworth T, Anderson M. Type-specific human papillomavirus DNA in abnormal smears as a predictor of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Br J Cancer 1994; 69: 16771.
  • 12
    Schneider A, Zahm DM, Greinke C, Kirchmayr R, Nindl I. Different detectability of high-risk HPV in smears from incident and prevalent high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix. Gynecol Oncol 1997; 65: 399404.
  • 13
    Sun CA, Liu JF, Wu DM, Nieh S, Yu CP, Chu TY. Viral load of high-risk human papillomavirus in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions. Int J Gynaecol Obstet 2002; 76: 417.
  • 14
    Swan DC, Tucker RA, Tortolero-Luna G, Mitchell MF, Wideroff L, Unger ER, Nisenbaum RA, Reeves WC, Icenogle JP. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA copy number is dependent on grade of cervical disease and HPV type. J Clin Microbiol 1999; 37: 10304.
  • 15
    Klein RS, Ho GY, Vermund SH, Fleming I, Burk RD. Risk factors for squamous intraepithelial lesions on Pap smear in women at risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection. J Infect Dis 1994; 170: 14049.
  • 16
    Womack SD, Chirenje ZM, Gaffikin L, Blumenthal PD, McGrath JA, Chipato T, Ngwalle S, Munjoma M, Shah KV. HPV-based cervical cancer screening in a population at high risk for HIV infection. Int J Cancer 2000; 85: 20610.
  • 17
    Josefsson A, Livak K, Gyllensten U. Detection and quantitation of human papillomavirus by using the fluorescent 5′ exonuclease assay. J Clin Microbiol 1999; 37: 4906.
  • 18
    Franco E, Villa L, Rohan T, Ferenczy A, Petzl-Erler M, Matlashewski G. Design and methods of the Ludwig-McGill longitudinal study of the natural history of human papillomavirus infection and cervical neoplasia in Brazil. Ludwig-McGill Study Group. Rev Panam Salud Publica 1999; 6: 22333.
  • 19
    Herbst AL. The Bethesda system for cervical/vaginal cytologic diagnoses. Clin Obstet Gynecol 1992; 35: 227.
  • 20
    Bauer HM, Ting Y, Greer CE, Chambers JC, Tashiro CJ, Chimera J, Reingold A, Manos MM. Genital human papillomavirus infection in female university students as determined by a PCR-based method. JAMA 1991; 265: 4727.
  • 21
    Hildesheim A, Schiffman MH, Gravitt PE, Glass AG, Greer CE, Zhang T, Scott DR, Rush BB, Lawler P, Sherman ME, Kurman RJ, Manos MM. Persistence of type-specific human papillomavirus infection among cytologically normal women. J Infect Dis 1994; 169: 23540.
  • 22
    Bernard HU, Chan SY, Manos MM, Ong CK, Villa LL, Delius H, Peyton CL, Bauer HM, Wheeler CM. Identification and assessment of known and novel human papillomaviruses by polymerase chain reaction amplification, restriction fragment length polymorphisms, nucleotide sequence, and phylogenetic algorithms. J Infect Dis 1994; 170: 107785.
  • 23
    Caballero OL, Villa LL, Simpson AJ. Low stringency-PCR (LS-PCR) allows entirely internally standardized DNA quantitation. Nucleic Acids Res 1995; 23: 1923.
  • 24
    van den Brule AJ, Snijders PJ, Gordijn RL, Bleker OP, Meijer CJ, Walboomers JM. General primer-mediated polymerase chain reaction permits the detection of sequenced and still unsequenced human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical scrapes and carcinomas. Int J Cancer 1990; 45: 6449.
  • 25
    Maldonado G, Greenland S. Simulation study of confounder-selection strategies. Am J Epidemiol 1993; 138: 92336.
  • 26
    Schlecht NF, Kulaga S, Robitaille J, Ferreira S, Santos M, Miyamura RA, Duarte-Franco E, Rohan TE, Ferenczy A, Villa LL, Franco EL. Persistent human papillomavirus infection as a predictor of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. JAMA 2001; 286: 310614.
  • 27
    Montz FJ. Management of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and potential complications. Clin Obstet Gynecol 2000; 43: 394409.
  • 28
    Mitchell MF, Schottenfeld D, Tortolero-Luna G, Cantor SB, Richards-Kortum R. Colposcopy for the diagnosis of squamous intraepithelial lesions: a meta-analysis. Obstet Gynecol 1998; 91: 62631.
  • 29
    Terry G, Ho L, Jenkins D, Hills M, Singer A, Mansell B, Beverley E. Definition of human papillomavirus type 16 DNA levels in low and high grade cervical lesions by a simple polymerase chain reaction technique. Arch Virol 1993; 128: 12333.
  • 30
    van Duin M, Snijders PJ, Schrijnemakers HF, Voorhorst FJ, Rozendaal L, Nobbenhuis MA, van den Brule AJ, Verheijen RH, Helmerhorst TJ, Meijer CJ. Human papillomavirus 16 load in normal and abnormal cervical scrapes: an indicator of CIN II/III and viral clearance. Int J Cancer 2002; 98: 5905.
  • 31
    Wentzensen N, Ridder R, Klaes R, Vinokurova S, Schaefer U, Doeberitz MK. Characterization of viral-cellular fusion transcripts in a large series of HPV16 and 18 positive anogenital lesions. Oncogene 2002; 21: 41926.