Prospective study of alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk in Japanese women

Authors


  • The present members of the JACC Study and their affiliations are as follows: Dr. A. Tamakoshi (chair), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine; Dr. M. Mori, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine; Dr. Y. Motohashi, Akita University School of Medicine; Dr. I. Tsuji, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine; Dr. Y. Nakamura, Jichi Medical School; Dr. H. Iso, Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tsukuba; Dr. H. Mikami, Chiba Cancer Center; Dr. Y. Inaba, Juntendo University School of Medicine; Dr. Y. Hoshiyama, University of Human Arts and Sciences Graduate School; Dr. H. Suzuki, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences; Dr. H. Shimizu, Gifu University School of Medicine; Dr. H. Toyoshima, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine; Dr. S. Tokudome, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medicine; Dr. Y. Ito, Fujita Health University School of Health Sciences; Dr. S. Hashimoto, Fujita Health University School of Medicine; Dr. S. Kikuchi, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine; Dr. K. Wakai, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute; Dr. A. Koizumi, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, Kyoto University; Dr. T. Kawamura, Kyoto University Center for Student Health; Dr. Y. Watanabe and Dr. T. Miki, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine Graduate School of Medical Science; Dr. C. Date, Faculty of Human Environmental Sciences, Mukogawa Women's University; Dr. K. Sakata, Wakayama Medical University; Dr. T. Nose, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine; Dr. N. Hayakawa, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University; Dr. T. Yoshimura, Institute of Industrial Ecological Sciences, University of Occupational and Environmental Health; Dr. A. Shibata, Kurume University School of Medicine; Dr. N. Okamoto, Kanagawa Cancer Center; Dr. H. Shio, Moriyama Municipal Hospital; Dr. Y. Ohno (former chair), Asahi Rosai Hospital; Dr. T. Kitagawa, Cancer Institute of the Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research; Dr. T. Kuroki, Gifu University; and Dr. K. Tajima, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute. Past investigators of the study group were listed in reference 23 except for the following 8 (affiliations are those at the time they participated in the study): Dr. T. Shimamoto, Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tsukuba; Dr. H. Tanaka, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical and Dental University; Dr. S. Hisamichi, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine; Dr. M. Nakao, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine; Dr. T. Suzuki, Research Institute, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases; Dr. T. Hashimoto, Wakayama Medical University; Dr. T. Ishibashi, Asama General Hospital; and Dr. K. Fukuda, Kurume University School of Medicine.

Abstract

Epidemiologic evidence is lacking for the association between alcohol consumption and the risk of breast cancer in Japanese women. We addressed this association in a prospective cohort study with an average follow-up of 7.6 years. At baseline (1988–1990), cohort participants completed a self-administered questionnaire that included alcohol use, reproductive history and hormone use. The women were followed up for breast cancer incidence through December 31, 1997. Cox proportional hazards models were used to calculate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer incidence and any association with alcohol consumption. During a follow-up of 271,412 person-years, we identified 151 women with breast cancer, of whom 45 were current drinkers and 11 drank ≥15 g of alcohol/day. After adjustment for age and other potential risk factors for breast cancer, the RR for current drinkers was 1.27 (95% CI 0.87–1.84) compared to nondrinkers. Average alcohol intake of <15 g/day did not significantly increase the risk for breast cancer. However, risk was significantly increased for women who consumed ≥15 g/day of alcohol (RR = 2.93, 95% CI 1.55–5.54). Age at starting drinking and frequency of consumption per week were not significantly associated with breast cancer risk. Our cohort study demonstrated that Japanese women who consume at least a moderate amount of alcohol have an increased risk of breast cancer. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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