Maternal smoking and the epidemic of testicular cancer—A nested case–control study

Authors

  • Andreas Pettersson,

    Corresponding author
    1. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    2. Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, CeRMS and Centre for Oncologic Prevention, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
    • Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Karolinska University Hospital, M9:01, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden
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    • Fax: +46-8-5177-9304.

  • Olof Akre,

    1. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Lorenzo Richiardi,

    1. Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, CeRMS and Centre for Oncologic Prevention, University of Turin, Turin, Italy
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  • Anders Ekbom,

    1. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Magnus Kaijser

    1. Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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Abstract

For no apparent reason, the incidence of testicular cancer has increased to epidemic proportions in many countries. Pregnancy smoking has been suggested to be a cause. Previous analytical studies have been negative, but the inherent difficulties in retrospective assessment of this exposure have led to no definite conclusion. We have conducted a population-based case–control study on 192 cases of testicular germ-cell cancer—born in Sweden in 1973 onwards and aged ≥15 at cancer diagnosis—and 494 matched controls, where data on maternal smoking were collected during pregnancy. We found no association with testicular cancer for maternal smoking during pregnancy (OR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.64–1.30), and there was no evidence of a dose–response effect. We conclude that the epidemic rise in testicular cancer in many populations is not due to the surge in smoking among women. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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