Population differences in immune marker profiles associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type I infection in Japan and Jamaica

Authors

  • Brenda M. Birmann,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    • Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA
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    • Fax: +617-525-2008

  • Elizabeth C. Breen,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
    Current affiliation:
    1. Cousins Center for Psychoneuroimmunology, Semel Institute for Neuroscience, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
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  • Sherri Stuver,

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA
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  • Beverly Cranston,

    1. Department of Pathology, University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica
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  • Otoniel Martínez-Maza,

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA
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  • Kerstin I. Falk,

    1. Centre for Microbiological Preparedness, Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Akihiko Okayama,

    1. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Miyazaki Medical College, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki, Japan
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  • Barrie Hanchard,

    1. Department of Pathology, University of the West Indies, Kingston, Jamaica
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  • Nancy Mueller,

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
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    • Nancy Mueller and Michie Hisada contributed equally to this work.

  • Michie Hisada

    1. Viral Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD
    Current affiliation:
    1. Takeda Global Research & Development Center, Inc., Deerfield, IL
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    • Nancy Mueller and Michie Hisada contributed equally to this work.


  • This article is a US Government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

Abstract

The natural history of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) has been shown to differ markedly by geographic area. The differences include contrasting patterns of risk of adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), which may be due in part to differences in host immune response to infection. To characterize variations in host immunity across populations, we compared serologic immune marker patterns in HTLV-I-endemic populations in Japan and Jamaica. We matched 204 participants with archived blood from the Miyazaki Cohort Study (Japan) and the Food Handlers Study (Jamaica)—i.e., 51 HTLV-I-positive (“carriers”) and 51 HTLV-I-negative individuals (“noncarriers”) from each population—by age, sex and blood collection year. We compared plasma concentrations of markers of T-cell-mediated (antigen-specific) and nonspecific immunity using regression models and correlation coefficients. Compared to Jamaican HTLV-I noncarriers, Japanese noncarriers had higher covariate-adjusted mean levels of T-cell activation markers, including antibody to Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (reciprocal titer 27 vs. 71, respectively, p = 0.005), soluble interleukin-2 receptor-α (477 vs. 623 pg/mL, p = 0.0008) and soluble CD30 (34 vs. 46 U/mL, p = 0.0001) and lower levels of C-reactive protein (1.1 vs. 0.43 μg/mL, p = 0.0004). HTLV-I infection was associated with activated T-cell immunity in Jamaicans but with diminished T-cell immunity in Japanese persons. The observed population differences in background and HTLV-I-related host immunity correspond closely to the divergent natural histories of infection observed among HTLV-I carriers in Japan and Jamaica and corroborate a role for host immune status in the contrasting patterns of ATL and HAM/TSP risk. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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