Acrylamide exposure measured by food frequency questionnaire and hemoglobin adduct levels and prostate cancer risk in the Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden Study

Authors

  • Kathryn M. Wilson,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
    • Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, 665 Huntington Ave., 3rd Floor, Boston, MA 02115, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Fax: 617-432-2435.

    • Kathryn M. Wilson and Katarina Bälter contributed equally to this work.

  • Katarina Bälter,

    1. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Kathryn M. Wilson and Katarina Bälter contributed equally to this work.

  • Hans-Olov Adami,

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
    2. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Henrik Grönberg,

    1. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Anna C. Vikström,

    1. Department of Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Birgit Paulsson,

    1. Department of Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Margareta Törnqvist,

    1. Department of Environmental Chemistry, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Margareta Törnqvist and Lorelei A. Mucci contributed equally to this work.

  • Lorelei A. Mucci

    1. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
    2. Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Margareta Törnqvist and Lorelei A. Mucci contributed equally to this work.


Abstract

Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed during the cooking of many commonly consumed foods. Data are scant on whether dietary acrylamide represents an important cancer risk in humans. We studied the association between acrylamide and prostate cancer risk using 2 measures of acrylamide exposure: intake from a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and acrylamide adducts to hemoglobin. We also studied the correlation between these 2 exposure measures. We used data from the population-based case-control study Cancer of the Prostate in Sweden (CAPS). Dietary data was available for 1,499 cases and 1,118 controls. Hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide were measured in blood samples from a subset of 170 cases and 161 controls. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of prostate cancer in high versus low quantiles of acrylamide exposure using logistic regression. The correlation between FFQ acrylamide intake and acrylamide adducts in non-smokers was 0.25 (95% confidence interval: 0.14–0.35), adjusted for age, region, energy intake, and laboratory batch. Among controls the correlation was 0.35 (95% CI: 0.21–0.48); among cases it was 0.15 (95% CI: 0.00–0.30). The OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus lowest quartile of acrylamide adducts was 0.93 (95% CI: 0.47–1.85, p-value for trend = 0.98). For FFQ acrylamide, the OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.75–1.27, p trend = 0.67). No significant associations were found between acrylamide exposure and risk of prostate cancer by stage, grade, or PSA level. Acrylamide adducts to hemoglobin and FFQ-measured acrylamide intake were moderately correlated. Neither measure of acrylamide exposure—hemoglobin adducts or FFQ—was associated with risk of prostate cancer. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary