A case-control study of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma among Caucasian organ transplant recipients: The role of antibodies against human papillomavirus and other risk factors

Authors

  • Delphine Casabonne,

    Corresponding author
    1. Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Headington, Oxford, United Kingdom
    • Programa de Recerca en Epidemiologia del Càncer–Cancer Epidemiology Research Program (CERP), Unitat d'Infeccions i Càncer–Unit of Infections and Cancer (UNIC), Institut Català d'Oncologia–Catalan Institute of Oncology, Avda. Gran Via, s/n Km. 2,7, 08907 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain
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    • Fax: +34-93-2607787.

  • Aoife Lally,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals, United Kingdom
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  • Liza Mitchell,

    1. Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary, University of London, London, United Kingdom
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  • Kristina M. Michael,

    1. Infection and Cancer Program, Department of Genome Modifications and Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Tim Waterboer,

    1. Infection and Cancer Program, Department of Genome Modifications and Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Michael Pawlita,

    1. Infection and Cancer Program, Department of Genome Modifications and Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, Heidelberg, Germany
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  • Beata Imko-Walczuk,

    1. Clinical Department of Plastic Surgery, Medical Academy of Gdánsk, ul. Dębinki 7, 80-952 Gdánsk, Poland
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  • Fenella Wojnarowska,

    1. Department of Dermatology, Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals, United Kingdom
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  • Charlotte Proby,

    1. Surgery and Molecular Oncology, Ninewells Hospital, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland
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  • Catherine Harwood,

    1. Centre for Cutaneous Research, Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary, University of London, London, United Kingdom
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  • Robert Newton

    1. Epidemiology and Genetics Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Heslington, York, United Kingdom
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: Erratum Volume 126, Issue 5, 1282, Article first published online: 11 December 2009

Abstract

A case-control study was conducted in 140 people with histology proven cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 454 controls, nested within 2 cohorts of organ transplant recipients (OTR) recruited in London and Oxford between 2002 and 2006. All participants had a skin examination, completed a questionnaire and had serum tested for antibodies against the L1 antigen of 34 HPV types using Luminex technology. SCC was more common in men than women (odds ratio [OR] = 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1–2.8, p = 0.02) and in people with susceptibility to burn easily (OR = 3.0, 95%CI: 1.9–4.8; p < 0.001). The risk increased with increasing age (p-trend < 0.001), increasing time since transplant (p-trend < 0.001), increasing self-reported number of sunburns as a child (p-trend < 0.001) and with the presence of viral warts (p < 0.001). As expected, antibodies against HPV 16 were associated with a self-reported history of an abnormal cervical smear among women (OR 5.1, 95%CI: 2.6–10.2) and antibodies against HPV 6 were associated with a self-reported history of genital warts (OR 4.0, 95%CI: 2.2–7.2). However, no clear associations between any of the HPV types examined (including cutaneous betaHPVs) and SCC were identified. For example, the seroprevalence of HPV 5 was 15% among cases and 9% among controls (p = 0.09) and the seroprevalence of HPV 8 was 23% among cases and 21% among controls (p = 0.6). Nor was seropositivity to multiple types associated with SCC. These serological data do not provide evidence for a role for HPV in the aetiology of cutaneous SCC among OTR in two UK-based populations. © 2009 UICC

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