A polymer coating applied to Salmonella prevents the binding of Salmonella-specific antibodies

Authors

  • Che-Hsin Lee,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    2. Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    • Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, 91 Hsueh-Shih Road, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
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    • Tel.: +886-4-2205-3366 ext: 2173, Fax: +886-4-2205-3764

  • Yu-Hsin Lin,

    1. Department of Biological Science and Technology, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
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  • Jeng-Long Hsieh,

    1. Department of Nursing, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan, Taiwan
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  • Man-Chin Chen,

    1. Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
    2. Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
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  • Wan-Lin Kuo

    1. Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
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Abstract

The use of Salmonella as a potential antitumor agent has been investigated, but innate immunity against this bacterium reduces the efficacy of its tumor-targeting and antitumor activities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the modulation of the tumor-targeting efficiency of Salmonella enterica serovar choleraesuis by modifying the immune response to these bacteria by coating them with poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH), designated PAH-S.C. To evaluate this modulation, we used naïve mice and mice immunized with Salmonella to study the role of the preexisting immune response to the antitumor activity of PAH-S.C. When anti-Salmonella antibodies were present, the invasion activity, cytotoxicity, and gene transfer of Salmonella was significantly decreased, both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with PAH-S.C. resulted in delayed tumor growth and enhanced survival in immunized mice. Furthermore, immunohistochemical studies of the tumors revealed the infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in immunized mice treated with PAH-S.C. These results indicate that Salmonella encapsulation effectively circumvented the Salmonella-specific immune response.

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