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Keywords:

  • MUTYH;
  • splicing;
  • colorectal cancer;
  • founder mutation;
  • lymphoblastoid cell lines

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Introduction
  4. Material and Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. References

MUTYH variants are differently distributed in geographical areas of the world. In MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP) patients from North-Eastern Italy, c.933+3A>C (IVS10+3A>C), a transversion causing an aberrant splicing process, accounts for nearly 1/5 of all mutations. The aim of this study was to verify whether its high frequency in North-Eastern Italy is due to a founder effect and to clarify its impact on MUTYH transcripts and protein. Haplotype analysis and age estimate performed on members of eleven Italian MAP families and cancer-free controls provided evidence that c.933+3A>C is a founder mutation originated about 83 generations ago. In addition, the Italian haplotype associated with the c.933+3A>C was also found in German families segregating the same mutation, indicating it had a common origin in Western Europe. Altogether c.933+3A>C and the two common Caucasian mutations p.Tyr179Cys and p.Gly396Asp represent about 60% of MUTYH alterations in MAP patients from North-Eastern Italy, suggesting the opportunity to perform targeted molecular screening for these variants in the diagnostic setting. Expression analyses performed on lymphoblastoid cell lines supported the notion that MUTYH c.933+3A>C alters splicing causing the synthesis of a non functional protein. However, some primary transcripts escape aberrant splicing, producing traces of full-length transcript and wild-type protein in a homozygote; this is in agreement with clinical findings that suggest a relatively mild phenotypic effect for this mutation. Overall, these data, that demonstrate a founder effect and further elucidate the splicing alterations caused by the MUTYH c.933+3A>C mutation, have important implications for genetic counseling and molecular diagnosis of MAP.


Introduction

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Introduction
  4. Material and Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. References

It is estimated that 5% of colorectal cancer (CRC) cases can be explained by inherited CRC syndromes.1 Several tumor suppressor genes (e.g., APC, TP53 and CDKN2A), proto-oncogenes (e.g., KRAS) and DNA repair genes2 are involved in CRC carcinogenesis. The latter includes genes of the mismatch repair system and MUTYH, a gene belonging to the base excision repair system.

MUTYH (OMIM 604933) encodes a DNA glycosylase involved in the repair of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), one of the typical mutagenic lesions generated by oxidative stress. Since 8-oxoG mispairs with adenine, MUTYH excises the mispaired adenine, thus preventing G:C>T:A transversions. Biallelic germline mutations in MUTYH were shown to result in multiple colorectal adenomas and CRC, likely as a result of the accumulation of G>T somatic mutations in APC, KRAS, and presumably other target genes.3, 4

MUTYH-Associated Polyposis (MAP; OMIM 608456) is an inherited polyposis syndrome with autosomal recessive transmission, accounting for about 1% of all CRC cases.1 The significance of monoallelic MUTYH mutations is still debated; our previous study on Italian patients, as well as larger case-control studies, provided evidence that the condition of heterozygosity for MUTYH mutations contributes to the development of some CRCs.5, 6

The distribution of MUTYH mutations shows ethnic differences.7, 8 p.Tyr179Cys (c.536A>G) and p.Gly396Asp (c.1187G>A) are the most frequent mutations in Caucasians,9 while other population-specific mutations have been reported in Japan (p.Arg245Cys and c.934-2A>C),10 Portugal (c.1227_1228dup)11 and Finland (p.Ala473Asp).12 As expected, in Italy the most common mutations are p.Tyr179Cys and p.Gly396Asp, associated with classical MAP phenotypes with some degree of variability. An Italian study found a relatively high frequency of the c.1437delGGA mutation,13 but its effective contribution to MAP in our country seems relatively marginal.

We recently detected c.933+3A>C, a MUTYH mutation already reported in the Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD),14 (http://chromium.liacs.nl/LOVD2/colon_cancer/home.php?select_db=MUTYH) in 11 unrelated cases, including one homozygote. This splicing variant accounts for about 15% of the MUTYH mutations identified in our cohort of MAP patients (12 out of 82 mutant alleles), coming mainly from the North-East of Italy. This finding appears particularly relevant if compared to the frequencies of the most common p.Tyr179Cys and p.Gly396Asp, each of which accounted for 22% of mutant alleles on the same series of cases, a relatively smaller fraction compared with other European regions. Of note, c.933+3A>C has been reported also in other populations, but at lower frequencies (1–8%).7, 9, 15–26 Since these data suggest the possible presence of a founder effect in the North-Eastern Italian population, we undertook haplotype analysis to verify this hypothesis. We also investigated in detail the molecular effects of this mutation.

Material and Methods

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Introduction
  4. Material and Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. References

Cases and controls

Since 2003 we have sequenced the MUTYH gene in 128 APC mutation-negative patients with polyposis referred to the Centro di Riferimento Oncologico in Aviano. We found 17 different MUTYH nonpolymorphic variants in 35 cases (27%). This study was carried out on 11 apparently unrelated families of probands with the c.933+3A>C mutation: 1 homozygote, 1 simple heterozygote and 9 compound heterozygotes (Table 1). Ten patients had attenuated polyposis, one had diffuse polyposis, and seven had developed CRC. Detailed family histories, including details on geographic origins were obtained for all patients. Genealogic investigations did not reveal any relationship between individuals from different families. All patients were resident in North-Eastern Italy and/or had North-Eastern Italian origin, specifically from the Veneto and Friuli-Venezia Giulia regions (Fig. 1).

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Figure 1. Map of Italy showing the geographic origin (areas in black) of the families segregating the c.933+3A>C mutation in North-Eastern Italy. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at wileyonlinelibrary.com.]

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Table 1. Genotypes and clinical characteristics of the families segregating the c.933+3A>C MUTYH mutation
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Seventy healthy controls, native from North-Eastern Italy, were investigated to estimate allele frequencies in the general population: these included 58 individuals with negative colonoscopy (clean colon), and 12 subjects belonging to nuclear pedigrees without history of CRC (parents from 6 father–mother–child trios). In addition, 8 noncarrier chromosomes from healthy relatives belonging to the Italian MAP families segregating the MUTYH recurrent mutation, were used to estimate control haplotypes.

DNA samples for haplotype analysis were also collected from members of 11 German MAP families segregating c.933+3A>C, ascertained through two homozygous and 9 compound heterozygous probands.

Overall, 37 individuals (22 probands and 15 relatives) from Italian and German families segregating the c.933+3A>C MUTYH mutation were investigated. One to three relatives were genotyped in 10 families. In the remaining families, only the index case was available for genotyping.

Samples from two healthy individuals with wild type (WT) MUTYH genotype were used as controls for mRNA and protein expression.

Informed consent was obtained from all study participants. The genetic testing protocol has been evaluated and approved by the Local Independent Ethical Committee (CRO-15-1997).

Sample collection and lymphoblastoid cell line establishment

Lymphocytes were collected from 20 ml of peripheral blood using Lymphoprep™ solution (Axis-Shield, Dundee, Scotland) according to manufacturer's instructions and resuspended in 90% FBS, 10% DMSO, frozen at −80°C and then stored in liquid nitrogen. Lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) were established from one c.933+3A>C homozygote, four c.933+3A>C compound heterozygotes (Table 1), and two MUTYH WT controls. Lymphocytes from patients and controls were thawed rapidly at 37°C and immortalized through EBV infection in presence of cyclosporin A. LCLs were grown in RPMI 10% FBS and 1% penicillin-streptomycin at 37°C and 5% CO2.

Microsatellite analysis

A set of 11 microsatellite markers spanning a region of ∼8 Mb covering the MUTYH locus was investigated. The following microsatellites, listed in order from telomere to centromere, were analyzed: D1S2861, D1S211, D1S421, D1S451, D1S2677, D1S3175, D1S2797, D1S2874, D1S2824, D1S197 and D1S427 (Table 2). PCR primer sequences were designed using Primer Blast software (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/tools/primer-blast/). Primer sequences and conditions are available on request. PCR product size determination was evaluated by capillary electrophoresis on an ABI3100 Sequencer using Genescan 2.1 software (Applied Biosystems, Foster city, CA).

Table 2. Microsatellite alleles in the MUTYH region most frequently observed in Italian MAP cases and controls
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Haplotyping and estimate of mutation age

Haplotypes including microsatellites D1S2861, D1S211, D1S421, D1S451, D1S2677, D1S3175, D1S2797 and D1S2874 were manually constructed to minimize the number of recombinations both in Italian and German families.

The DMLE+2.2 software developed by Rannala and Reeve27 was used to estimate the age of c.933+3A>C in North-Eastern Italy. The program, freely available at URL: http://www.dmle.org, uses a Bayesian approach to compare differences in linkage disequilibrium between the mutation and flanking markers in DNA samples from mutation carriers and controls. The software generates the marginal posterior probability density of mutation age based on the following parameters: (a) observed haplotypes or genotypes in normal and affected chromosomes; (b) map distances between markers and mutation site; (c) population growth rates and (d) an estimated proportion of the mutation bearing chromosomes sampled.

Map distances were estimated on the basis of the Marshfield genetic map (URL:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/mapview/) or inferred on the basis of physical distances (in Mb) given in UCSC Genome Browser (GRCh37/hg19 assembly) considering 1 Mb = 1cM.

The population growth rate (genr) in Northern-eastern Italy was estimated with the following formula: equation image in which genr is the population growth rate per generation, Pt is the estimated present population size, P0 is the estimated size of the population at reference time and g is the number of generations between these two time points. The total population of the Veneto region and of the provinces of Pordenone and Udine in Friuli currently comprises 5,737,630 people (http://demo.istat.it/). Historical and demographic data indicate that about 800,000 people lived in this area in year 1200.28 Accordingly, the average genr of this population was estimated to be 0.0599 from 1200 to the present time, assuming 25 years/generation. The latter value was used for mutation age estimates.

The proportion of mutation bearing chromosomes sampled was estimated to be 0.0677 and was calculated considering a population of 3,688,558 inhabitants living in the area of the North-Eastern Italy from which the patients originated (provinces of Udine, Pordenone, Venezia, Rovigo, Verona, Treviso and Belluno), and assuming that the prevalence of MAP (clinical plus subclinical biallelic carriers) is about 1:10,000 among Europeans.29

MUTYH mRNA analysis

Totally, 2–3 x 106 lymphoblastoid cells from five patients and two controls were pelleted and RNA was extracted with the EZ1 QIAgen RNA extraction Mini-kit (QIAgen, Germantown, MD). Genomic DNA contamination was avoided by the addition of DNAse during the extraction phase. Reverse transcription was performed using the Reverse Transcription System kit (Promega, Madison, WI) on 1 μg of total RNA.

Quantitative analysis of MUTYH transcripts was performed on cDNA by real-time duplex PCR, with home-made and predeveloped TaqMan assays (Applied Biosystems) on a Biorad CFX 96 thermal cycler, using the TaqMan Gene Expression Master Mix (Applied Biosystems). Three different MUTYH TaqMan assays were designed and used for relative quantification. MUTYH wild-type and mutated signals were detected using two FAM-TAMRA probes, specific for exon 9-exon 10 and exon 9-exon 11 junctions, respectively. The total amount of MUTYH mRNA (nuclear and mitochondrial forms, normal and mutated) was detected with a predeveloped TaqMan Gene Expression Assay (Applied Biosystems) containing a FAM-MGB probe directed at the junction between exons 5 and 6. Each MUTYH assay signal was normalized by quantitation of housekeeping genes in duplex condition. Two different housekeeping genes (β-actin and β-tubulin) were analyzed through predeveloped assays containing a VIC-MGB probe (Applied Biosystems). Quantitative evaluation was carried out by comparing the mutated samples with the two WT controls by the ΔΔCt method.

Western blotting

Lymphoblastoid cells (5 x 106) were centrifuged to eliminate the culture medium and washed once with PBS 1X. Pelleted cells were then resuspended in lysis buffer (Tris-HCl 20 mM, NaCl 100 mM, MgCl2 5 mM, EDTA 0.2 mM, NP40 0.1%) containing protease and phosphatase inhibitors (Sigma, St.Luis, MO) and incubated 30 min on ice. Lysed cells were then centrifuged in a microfuge and the supernatant, containing whole cell protein extract, was collected in a new vial. Protein concentration was determined by Bradford assay (BioRad, Hercules, CA) and 50 μg of whole cell extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting. The primary antibody used was a mouse monoclonal anti-MUTYH (Ab 55551; Abcam, Cambridge, UK) specific for a C-terminal protein epitope (aa 435-535). The signal was amplified by an HRP-conjugated secondary antibody and revealed by Enhanced ChemiLuminescence (ECL; GE Healthcare, Little Chalfont, UK). MUTYH signals were normalized using the β-tubulin housekeeping protein (rabbit polyclonal anti-tubulin β, Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Santa Cruz, CA).

Results were confirmed in three independent experiments performed on LCL whole extracts produced in different extraction sessions.

Statistical analyses

Allele frequency distributions in wild type and Italian c.933+3A>C chromosomes were compared by Fisher's exact tests; p < 0.01 was considered as a cut-off for statistical significance.

Western blot and real-time PCR results are reported as mean ± SD of signals obtained in three experiments. Comparisons of expression levels between patient and control samples were performed with a two-tailed paired Student's t test (*p < 0.05, **p < 0.01 and ***p < 0.001).

Results

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Introduction
  4. Material and Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. References

Haplotype analysis and age estimation

To verify the presence of a possible founder effect, allele and haplotype analyses were first performed on the 11 Italian families segregating the c.933+3A>C mutation and on 148 Italian control chromosomes (140 from the healthy control individuals and 8 from noncarrier relatives in MAP families). Statistically significant differences in allele frequencies between control and c.933+3A>C chromosomes were observed at loci D1S211, D1S421, D1S451, D1S2677 and D1S3175 (Table 2), the markers located closer to MUTYH, strongly suggesting a founder effect.

Haplotype analysis using eight microsatellite markers flanking the MUTYH locus was performed on probands and, when possible, on additional family members. Five families/individuals, including the c.933+3A>C homozygote, shared a common haplotype at loci D1S421, D1S451, D1S2677 and D1S3175 (148-246-167-157) spanning a region of ∼0.8 Mb (Table 3). This common haplotype was not found in control chromosomes. In addition, although molecular analysis was not completely informative for D1S451, the same haplotype combination appeared to be the most likely in four additional families/individuals (FAP82, FAP294, FAP117, FAP443).

Table 3. Haplotype analysis in the families segregating the c.933+3A>C MUTYH mutation
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In family CFS167, the D1S451 allele on the c.933+3A>C chromosome differs from that found in the other patients investigated. This finding is compatible with either a recombination event or a mutation that occurred in D1S451 on the founder chromosome. Another possible recombination between markers D1S2677 and D1S451 was observed in proband FAP181; however, his haplotypes could not be defined with certainty because no other family members were available for analysis.

Mutation age estimate based on DMLE+2.2 software was ∼83 generations (95% credible set: 57–137) (Fig. 2), using haplotype data from probands and controls.

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Figure 2. Posterior probability distribution plot of the c.933+3A>C mutation age (in generations), as estimated by DMLE+2.2 software (genr = 0.0599). The vertical broken lines indicate the 95% credible set of value for the calculation. Peak: 83 generations (95% credible set 57–137).

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In addition, haplotype analysis using eight microsatellites was performed on eleven German probands and three family members with the c.933+3A>C mutation. Although segregation could not be investigated in detail, the allele combinations observed in all probands, including two unrelated homozygotes, were compatible with the shared Italian haplotype at loci D1S421, D1S451, D1S2677 and D1S3175 (148-246-167-157) (Table 3).

MUTYH expression analyses

Analysis of splicing alteration showed that all samples with c.933+3A>C had exon 10 skipping and traces of additional transcripts retaining intron 11, with and without exon 10, which probably represent alternatively spliced isoforms (data not shown). The full-length and skipped transcripts were then quantified by real-time TaqMan PCR assays (Fig. 3a). Mean results of three different experiments showed that all c.933+3A>C positive samples expressed equal or slightly reduced amounts of total MUTYH transcripts (exons 5-6 probe) compared to controls. In addition, based on the exon 9-10-specific assay, all mutated samples had a level of transcript containing exon 10 significantly lower compared to controls (<50%). Interestingly, we observed that the homozygote for c.933+3A>C produces traces of correctly spliced MUTYH transcript (about 10% of the total amount). To integrate data of the exon 9-10 assay, we also quantified c.933+3A>C transcripts lacking exon 10 using an exon 9-exon 11 probe. As expected, both WT samples were negative for this assay, whereas all LCLs from compound heterozygotes expressed the −exon 10 transcript, in amounts lower than 50% compared to the FAP349 homozygote.

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Figure 3. Quantitation of MUTYH gene and protein expression in LCLs (a) mRNA expression analysis by real-time PCR. Graphs report the mean ratio of MUTYH exon 5–6, 9–10 and 9–11 assay signals normalized by β-tubulin and β-actin genes (mean of three experiments with standard deviations). Control bars are WT (mean results obtained on two wild-type LCLs) for the 5–6 and 9–10 assays, FAP349 (c.933+3A>C homozygote) for the 9–11 assay. An assay scheme is reported below each graph (P, probe; FW, forward primer; REV, reverse primer). *p < 0.05 and **p < 0.01 relative to controls. (b) Western blot analysis of MUTYH protein. Bars with standard deviations represent the mean ratio between MUTYH and β-tubulin for three experiments on each sample. **p < 0.01 and ***p < 0.001 relative to WT controls. [Color figure can be viewed in the online issue, which is available at wileyonlinelibrary.com.]

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FAP349 expressed traces of full-length protein, whereas compound heterozygous LCLs expressed variable amounts of MUTYH, ranging from 1 to 90% of the WT signal, depending on the nature of the second mutation and on the affinity of the primary antibody used that fails to recognize C-terminal truncated protein products (Fig. 3b).

Discussion

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Introduction
  4. Material and Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. References

During the last 8 years the functional effects of different MUTYH mutations have been characterized,30–34 and the results of mutation analyses have revealed the existence of ethnic differences in the distribution of MUTYH variants.7, 8 However, so far, founder effects have not been documented for MUTYH variants.

The c.933+3A>C mutation is frequently found in patients from the North-East of Italy. It involves the 3rd base of intron 10, altering the consensus sequence of the donor splice site. Skipping of exon 10 with insertion of a premature stop codon has been documented.21 The LOVD database reports the predicted effect on the protein as p.Gly264TrpfsX7.14 In our cohort of patients, it accounted for about 15% of all MUTYH mutations so far identified. c.933+3A>C is present in other populations, although its proportion among MUTYH mutations has been found to be lower (1–8%) in studies on Caucasian patients from North America and other European countries.7, 9, 15–26 In particular, it has been identified in several German and in a few Swiss patients (LOVD).

In this study, we identified a common haplotype spanning a region of approximately 0.8 Mb surrounding the MUTYH gene, in North–Eastern Italian and German families segregating the c.933+3A>C. According to the DMLE+2.2 software, the age of the MUTYH c.933+3A>C mutation was estimated as 83 generations (95% credible set: 57–137), corresponding to ∼2,075 (95% credible set: 1,425–3,425) years. Therefore its origin in North-Eastern Italy should date back to when the Venetics (Venetian population) lived in this area. However, it is worth noting that the method used estimates the time of origin of the mutation and not the time from the most recent common ancestor in Italy.35 In addition, the results obtained with the DMLE, like with other Bayesian methods for the determination of age of mutation origin or age of the most recent common ancestor, are influenced by the input parameters used, namely the genr value. The genr used in this study was calculated based on the most reliable historical estimates of population size that are available for North-Eastern Italy.

The evidence that the Italian and German c.933+3A>C chromosomes share the same haplotype suggests that this mutation has originated only once in the past, at least in Europe. From available data it cannot be determined if the c.933+3A>C originated in Italy and then spread to other areas where it is now found at appreciable frequencies, or alternatively, if it entered in the Italian population from somewhere else, possibly Germany, and then became frequent in Italy. This issue could possibly be solved when data on the c.933+3A>C frequency in different parts of Europe will become available.

Analyses of mRNA extracted from LCLs confirmed the presence of transcripts lacking exon 10 in 5 patients with the c.933+3A>C mutation (1 homozygote and 4 compound heterozygotes). This aberrant mRNA, if translated, determines the synthesis of a truncated protein lacking a nuclear localization signal and the binding site for APE1 (human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease) and PCNA (Proliferating Cells Nuclear Antigen). A MUTYH protein devoid of these functional domains most likely would lose nuclear localization and DNA repair activity. As previously described for c.934-2A>G,30 the truncated MUTYH protein could accumulate in the cytoplasm.

A real-time quantitative assay for MUTYH transcripts was set up to compare transcript levels between patients and controls and to measure the proportion of altered transcript on the total amount of MUTYH mRNA produced. Results showed that the overall levels of MUTYH transcript were equal, or slightly lower, in all c.933+3A>C LCLs compared to WT controls. As expected, all c.933+3A>C samples had significantly lower levels of correctly spliced transcript in comparison with controls. Interestingly, also the FAP349 LCL homozygous for c.933+3A>C revealed traces of normal transcript. This finding indicates that a very small amount of transcript produced from mutant alleles can be correctly spliced, generating traces of full-length functional protein, as revealed by Western blot analysis. Quantitative real-time analysis confirmed the presence of significantly lower amounts of −exon 10 transcripts in heterozygotes compared to FAP349, and that WT LCLs did not produce the aberrantly spliced transcript.

Protein amounts produced by LCLs with the c.933+3A>C mutation ranged between 1 and 100% of WT LCLs. This wide variability was dependent on the effects of the second mutation. The homozygous mutant gave less than 10% of WT signal. When the second mutation event caused another frameshift with insertion of a premature stop codon (c.1147delC in FAP278), no significant signal was observed, according to the predicted loss of MUTYH C-terminal target epitope for the antibody used in this study. On the other hand, when the second mutation event determined loss (FAP117) or substitution (FAP181 and FAP294) of a single aminoacid, protein band intensities were variable. FAP117 and FAP294 express about 50% of the MUTYH protein levels observed in WT cells; likely, the c.1437delGGA (p.Glu480del) and c.734G>A (p.Arg245Hys) alleles present in these LCLs are able to drive the synthesis of almost normal protein amounts, indicating that these mutations do not grossly affect mRNA or protein stability. Instead, the compound heterozygote FAP181 containing c.1187G>A (p.Gly396Asp) expresses protein amounts equal to WT, suggesting that the produced protein is stable but not functional, in accordance with previous findings.31 Unfortunately, the lack of reliable antibodies directed against the N-terminus of MUTYH prevented us to investigate the expression and stability of the putatively truncated protein. However, if the c.933+3A>C encoded a truncated p.Gly264TrpfsX7 protein, this would likely not be functional due to the loss of nuclear localization and impaired binding to key components of DNA repair.

On the basis of these findings, subjects carrying a homozygous MUTYH c.933+3A>C mutation should have a reduced ability to correct nuclear DNA damages induced by reactive oxygen species in their colon mucosa, and this would increase the risk of adenomas and CRC. The extent of risk in compound heterozygotes is likely to be dependent on the effects of the second mutation. Almost all c.933+3A>C carriers in our series had an attenuated form of polyposis, the most common phenotype in MAP patients.9 Interestingly, the homozygous FAP349 patient underwent hemicolectomy following a diagnosis of attenuated polyposis (less than 30 polyps) at 51 years, in absence of CRC. Conversely, CRC was diagnosed before 55 years of age in 7 of the other 11 compound heterozygotes. The observation that traces of full-length transcripts and proteins are expressed in c.933+3A>C LCLs suggest that the mutant allele maintains a minimal residual MUTYH function, thus producing an attenuated phenotype. On the other hand, it has been observed that mutations that completely inactivate the MUTYH protein, such as frameshift variants and the Caucasian p.Tyr179Cys mutation, are usually associated with a more severe phenotype.9

The molecular and clinical data obtained in this study and the demonstration of a founder effect for c.933+3A>C have implications for MUTYH genetic testing. To optimize MUTYH mutation analysis, a rapid screening for c.933+3A>C and for the two most common Caucasian mutations (p.Gly396Asp and p.Tyr179Cys) could be undertaken as a first step for molecular analysis in polyposis patients of ascertained North-Eastern Italy ancestry. Since altogether these three mutations account for almost 60% of the MUTYH alterations detected in this area, a simple multiplex ad hoc test would allow to rapidly establish a genetic diagnosis of MAP in at least one third of patients with this condition. Moreover, this test could be also applied for genetic prescreening of polyposis/CRC patients not fully complying with current criteria for referral to MUTYH genetic testing. In addition, the data here presented suggest that genotype knowledge may be useful for phenotype prediction and consequently to establish tailored surveillance. However, evaluation of larger series will be necessary to allow a better definition of genotype/phenotype correlations, in order to optimize surveillance in at risk individuals.

Acknowledgements

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Introduction
  4. Material and Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. References

This study was partially supported by grants from ACC (Alleanza Contro il Cancro) – INTEF Project and Ministero della Salute – Rare Disease Project (to AV), and from Istituto Toscano Tumori (to MG) and Ente Cassa di Risparmio di Firenze (to FiorGen).

References

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Introduction
  4. Material and Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Acknowledgements
  8. References