Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in esophageal precancer lesions and squamous cell carcinomas from China

Authors

  • Fuju Chang,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Pathology, University of Kuopio, Finland
    2. Department of Pathology, Henan Medical University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People′s Republic of China
    3. Kuopio Cancer Research Centre, University of Kuopio, Finland
    • Department of Pathology, University of Kuopio, P.O. Box 6, SF-70211 Kuopio, Finland
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  • S. Syrjänen,

    1. Department of Pathology, University of Kuopio, Finland
    2. Kuopio Cancer Research Centre, University of Kuopio, Finland
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  • Qiong Shen,

    1. Department of Pathology, Henan Medical University, Zhengzhou, Henan, People′s Republic of China
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  • Hongxiu Ji,

    1. Department of Pathology, University of Kuopio, Finland
    2. Kuopio Cancer Research Centre, University of Kuopio, Finland
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  • K. Syrjänen

    1. Department of Pathology, University of Kuopio, Finland
    2. Kuopio Cancer Research Centre, University of Kuopio, Finland
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Abstract

A series of 51 biopsies derived from the same number of patients with established invasive squamous-cell carcinoma of the esophagus in Linxian, a high-risk area for esophageal cancer in China, were analyzed histologically and by in situ DNA hybridization to demonstrate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Epithelial changes suggesting HPV infection within or adjacent to the carcinoma lesions were found in 25 cases (49.0%). Esophageal lesions with HPV morphology showed both flat (25 cases) and inverted condylomas (2 cases) resembling those found in the genital tract. HPV 6, 11, 16 or 18 DNA sequences were detected in 22/51 (43.1%) of the esophageal specimens. HPV DNA was most frequently localized in epithelium adjacent to carcinomas in areas showing either epithelial hyperplasia (36.1%) or dysplasia (22.2%). Of the lesions with morphological HPV changes, 64% (16/22) were shown to contain HPV DNA. In 2 specimens, HPV DNA was found in frankly malignant cells. High-risk types HPV 16 and/or 18 DNA sequences were found in 16 of the 22 HPV DNA-positive cases (72.7%). Our results confirm previously reported HPV involvement in esophageal squamous-cell lesions, and support the hypothesis of HPV as a possible etiological agent in esophageal carcinogenesis.

Ancillary