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International Journal of Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 132 Issue 10

15 May 2013

Volume 132, Issue 10

Pages 2223–2470

  1. Mini Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
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      High-risk HPV testing on self-sampled versus clinician-collected specimens: A review on the clinical accuracy and impact on population attendance in cervical cancer screening (pages 2223–2236)

      Peter J.F. Snijders, Viola M.J. Verhoef, Marc Arbyn, Gina Ogilvie, Silvia Minozzi, Rita Banzi, Folkert J. van Kemenade, Daniëlle A.M. Heideman and Chris J.L.M. Meijer

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27790

  2. Cancer Cell Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
    1. You have free access to this content
      Inhibition of leydig tumor growth by farnesoid X receptor activation: The in vitro and in vivo basis for a novel therapeutic strategy (pages 2237–2247)

      Stefania Catalano, Salvatore Panza, Rocco Malivindi, Cinzia Giordano, Ines Barone, Gianluca Bossi, Marilena Lanzino, Rosa Sirianni, Loredana Mauro, Diego Sisci, Daniela Bonofiglio and Sebastiano Andò

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27915

      What's new?

      Leydig cell tumors are the most common tumors of the gonadal stroma, and currently there are no effective ways to treat such tumors should they be malignant. Farnesoid X receptors (FXR) are expressed in Leydig tumor cells, and here the authors show that FXR activation through synthetic ligands reduces tumor growth. The mechanism involves both inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis, with an underlying increase of p53 gene expression. This study provides the first direct evidence for in vivo effects of FXR activation on Leydig carcinogenesis, suggesting that FXR ligands could potentially be used in a clinical approach.

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      Mdm2 inhibitors synergize with topoisomerase II inhibitors to induce p53-independent pancreatic cancer cell death (pages 2248–2257)

      Laura Conradt, Annika Henrich, Matthias Wirth, Maximilian Reichert, Marina Lesina, Hana Algül, Roland M. Schmid, Oliver H. Krämer, Dieter Saur and Günter Schneider

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27916

      What's new?

      Using a murine pancreatic cancer cell line platform with genetically defined p53 status, the authors demonstrate that inhibitors of Mdm2, a negative regulator of the tumor suppressor p53, increases the sensitivity of pancreatic cancer cells towards topoisomerase II inhibitors in a p53-independent manner. They provide evidence that Mdm2 binds to Nijmegen breakage syndrome (Nbs) 1 of the Mre11–Rad50–Nbs1 DNA double strand break repair complex, thus providing evidence that Mdm2 inhibitors may be therapeutically effective by delaying repair of DNA double strand breaks in a subset of pancreatic cancer cells.

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      Ovarian cancer cells, not normal cells, are damaged by Mirk/Dyrk1B kinase inhibition (pages 2258–2269)

      Jing Hu, Holly Deng and Eileen A. Friedman

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27917

      What's new?

      Chemotherapeutic drugs and radiation are more toxic to cycling than quiescent cancer cells. Quiescent ovarian cancer cells are enriched in the Mirk/dyrk1B kinase, which may be a therapeutic target if normal quiescent diploid cells are not affected. The authors show that Mirk/dyrk1B inhibition elevated cyclin D levels, allowing cancer cells to escape G0/G1 quiescence and enter the cell cycle with high ROS levels and DNA damage, leading to cell death. The same treatment in normal quiescent diploid cells had little effect on cell viability, underscoring the therapeutic potential of Mirk/dyrk1B inhibition in cancer cells.

      Corrected by:

      Errata: Erratum-ovarian cancer cells, not normal cells, are damaged by mirk/dyrk1b kinase inhibition

      Vol. 137, Issue 6, E13, Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2015

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      Cross-talk of alpha tocopherol-associated protein and JNK controls the oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells (pages 2270–2282)

      Baoyi Zhu, Xiaojuan Li, Yuying Zhang, Chunwei Ye, Yu Wang, Songwang Cai, Huaiqiu Huang, Yi Cai, Shuyuan Yeh, Zhenhua Huang, Ruihan Chen, Yiran Tao and Xingqiao Wen

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27927

      What's new?

      Alpha-tocopherol associated protein (TAP) is a vitamin E-binding factor downregulated in several cancers. Here, the authors show that TAP potently promotes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/ROS-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. Signaling downstream of JNK to the AP-1 complex was found to be involved. The authors speculate that reintroduction of TAP may be beneficial to overcome drug resistance in prostate cancer.

      Corrected by:

      Retraction: Retraction

      Vol. 137, Issue 8, 2040, Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2015

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      Modeling and characterization of inflammatory breast cancer emboli grown in vitro (pages 2283–2294)

      Heather L. Lehman, Erica J. Dashner, Michelle Lucey, Peter Vermeulen, Luc Dirix, Steven Van Laere and Kenneth L. van Golen

      Version of Record online: 19 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27928

      What's new?

      Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the deadliest form of breast cancer. It is highly lymphoinvasive, and appears to metastasize rapidly. In this study, the authors developed an in vitro method for growing IBC that mimics the dermal lymphatic microenvironment. Using this model, they found that cell clusters from IBC emboli are able to invade via RhoC GTPase-dependent amoebic movement. This invasiveness was disrupted by exposure to TGF-beta. This novel, biologically relevant system will yield a better understanding of IBC growth and metastasis, as well as potential treatment strategies.

  3. Cancer Genetics

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
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      Identification of NUCKS1 as a colorectal cancer prognostic marker through integrated expression and copy number analysis (pages 2295–2302)

      Akifumi Kikuchi, Toshiaki Ishikawa, Kaoru Mogushi, Megumi Ishiguro, Satoru Iida, Hiroshi Mizushima, Hiroyuki Uetake, Hiroshi Tanaka and Kenichi Sugihara

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27911

      What's new

      The integration of gene expression analysis and genomic profiling represents an efficient approach to the discovery of cancer-related genes. Here, through a combination of gene expression and copy number analysis, NUCKS1 was identified as a candidate gene involved in the distant metastasis of colorectal cancer. The association of NUCKS1 protein overexpression with poor overall survival in colorectal cancer suggests that NUCKS1 may be a prognostic marker for the disease.

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      Non-CpG island promoter hypomethylation and miR-149 regulate the expression of SRPX2 in colorectal cancer (pages 2303–2315)

      Bodil Øster, Lene Linnet, Lise Lotte Christensen, Kasper Thorsen, Halit Ongen, Emmanouil T Dermitzakis, Juan Sandoval, Sebastian Moran, Manel Esteller, Torben F. Hansen, Philippe Lamy, On behalf of the COLOFOL steering group, Søren Laurberg, Torben F. Ørntoft and Claus L. Andersen

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27921

      What's new?

      DNA hypo- and hypermethylation both occur frequently in colorectal cancer, yet so far most attention has focused on the role of hypermethylation in silencing critical genes with CpG island promoters. This study provides evidence that hypomethylation of non-CpG island promoters deregulate gene expression nearly as frequently as does the hypermethylation of CpG island promoters. The authors identified 35 genes whose non-CpG island promoters were hypomethylated and expression levels inversely correlated. Hypomethylation of SRPX2 also correlated with poorly differentiated tumors, indicating its important role during CRC progression. The authors further identified miR-149 as a potential novel post-transcriptional regulator of SRPX2.

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      Cancer cells preferentially lose small chromosomes (pages 2316–2326)

      Pascal H.G. Duijf, Nikolaus Schultz and Robert Benezra

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27924

      What's new?

      Aneuploidy—an abnormal number of chromosomes resulting from missegregation during cell division—is a hallmark of most cancers and is strongly associated with poor prognosis. However, a systematic study of the nature of whole-chromosome aneuploidy is lacking. Looking at a large tumor dataset, here the authors find that nearly all chromosomes, particularly small ones, are preferentially lost rather than gained. They also find that, despite the strong bias towards chromosome loss, chromosome gains constitute a poorer prognostic marker in ovarian carcinoma patients. These results could facilitate more accurate genetic cancer modeling and the development of more effective treatment strategies.

  4. Tumor Immunology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
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      Cytotoxic and immune-mediated killing of human colorectal cancer by reovirus-loaded blood and liver mononuclear cells (pages 2327–2338)

      Robert A. Adair, Karen J. Scott, Sheila Fraser, Fiona Errington-Mais, Hardev Pandha, Matt Coffey, Peter Selby, Graham P. Cook, Richard Vile, Kevin J. Harrington, Giles Toogood and Alan A. Melcher

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27918

      What's new?

      Reovirus can deliver a double whammy to cancer: it hunts down and destroys ras-activated tumor cells, and it can also fire up the immune system against the tumor. The immune system, however, is a fickle ally; in addition to attacking tumor cells, an efficient immune response also rids the body of reovirus, hindering therapy. This study investigated whether therapeutic reovirus could be shielded from immune assault. They showed that loading reovirus onto blood mononuclear cells provides safe transportation to target cells, in this case, colorectal tumor cells, and the reovirus-loaded immune cells themselves also launch an attack against tumor cells. Reovirus appears to be a promising new avenue for cancer treatment.

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      Recombinant anti-podoplanin (NZ-1) immunotoxin for the treatment of malignant brain tumors (pages 2339–2348)

      Vidyalakshmi Chandramohan, Xuhui Bao, Mika Kato Kaneko, Yukinari Kato, Stephen T. Keir, Scott E. Szafranski, Chien-Tsun Kuan, Ira H. Pastan and Darell D. Bigner

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27919

      What's new?

      Podoplanin is a glycoprotein that is overexpressed in several types of malignant tumor, including glioblastoma, medulloblastoma, mesothelioma, and germ-cell tumors. In this study, the authors constructed a novel immunotoxin to target podoplanin, by fusing a monoclonal antibody fragment to exotoxin A from Pseudomonas. In preclinical studies, this immunotoxin, called NZ-1-(scdsFv)-PE38KDEL, increased survival by 41%. Its specificity and high binding affinity allow for specific targeting of tumor cells while avoiding adjacent normal tissue, thereby having the potential to improve survival of patients with brain tumors.

  5. Early Detection and Diagnosis

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
    1. You have free access to this content
      Immunogenic cell death biomarkers HMGB1, RAGE, and DNAse indicate response to radioembolization therapy and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients (pages 2349–2358)

      Yvonne Nadine Fahmueller, Dorothea Nagel, Ralf-Thorsten Hoffmann, Klaus Tatsch, Tobias Jakobs, Petra Stieber and Stefan Holdenrieder

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27894

      What's new?

      Radioembolization therapy (RE) is an effective therapy for colorectal cancer patients with liver metastases. However, data on predictive factors to assess treatment response are lacking. The authors examined the role of HMGB1, a nuclear protein released during cell death and acting as a danger-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) protein recognized by specific immune cells. Serum levels of HMGB1 were found to rise early after RE therapy, and high pre- and posttherapeutic levels of serum HMGB1 were associated with poor treatment response with unfavorable prognosis in uni- and multivariate analyses. These results point to HMGB1 as a potential new biomarker for treatment response in RE therapy.

  6. Epidemiology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
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      Cancer net survival on registry data: Use of the new unbiased Pohar-Perme estimator and magnitude of the bias with the classical methods (pages 2359–2369)

      Laurent Roche, Coraline Danieli, Aurélien Belot, Pascale Grosclaude, Anne-Marie Bouvier, Michel Velten, Jean Iwaz, Laurent Remontet and Nadine Bossard

      Version of Record online: 3 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27830

      What's new?

      “Net survival” refers to the risk of dying from a particular cancer, after all other risks are removed. Unfortunately, due to inherent biases, most of the statistical methods used to estimate net survival are quite inaccurate. In this study, the authors used a new method called the “Pohar-Perme estimator, ” (PPE) to analyze data from cancer registries, with various combinations of prognosis and age distribution. They conclude that PPE lacks the biases of the other methods and should become the preferred standard for estimating net survival.

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      Unbiased estimates of long-term net survival of solid cancers in France (pages 2370–2377)

      Valérie Jooste, Pascale Grosclaude, Laurent Remontet, Guy Launoy, Isabelle Baldi, Florence Molinié, Patrick Arveux, Nadine Bossard, Anne-Marie Bouvier, Marc Colonna and the French Network of Cancer Registries (FRANCIM)

      Version of Record online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27857

      What's new?

      The relative survival rates reported for many types of cancer are subject to bias. Net survival, on the other hand, allows for comparisons between populations, because it isn't affected by mortalities due to other causes. In this study, the authors used the new, unbiased Pohar-Perme method to evaluate net survival in a large cohort of patients with solid tumors, and extended the standard follow-up period to 10 years. Their results confirm that prognosis for most types of cancer worsens with age, and that cancer management has improved survival rates over the last decade in France.

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      Unbiased estimates of long-term net survival of hematological malignancy patients detailed by major subtypes in France (pages 2378–2387)

      Alain Monnereau, Xavier Troussard, Aurélien Belot, Anne-Valérie Guizard, Anne-Sophie Woronoff, Simona Bara, Bénédicte Lapôtre-Ledoux, Jean Iwaz, Brigitte Tretarre, Marc Maynadié and The French Network of Cancer Registries (FRANCIM)

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27889

      What's new?

      Net survival data allow comparisons of disease-specific mortality between different countries or time periods. Relative survival estimates, on the other hand, provide biased net survival rates. In this study, the authors used the unbiased Pohar-Perme estimator to evaluate longer (10-year) net survival rates of French patients with haematological malignancies (HM) by sex, age classes, and ten major HM subtypes. Because HM subtypes differ widely in clinical presentation, treatment, and prognosis, population-based survival data detailed by subtype are important for measuring outcomes of HM management, as well as for long-range healthcare planning.

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      Influence of radiotherapy for the first tumor on aggressiveness of contralateral breast cancer (pages 2388–2394)

      Maria E.C. Sandberg, Sara Alkner, Mikael Hartman, Sandra Eloranta, Lisa Rydén, Alexander Ploner, Hans-Olov Adami, Per Hall and Kamila Czene

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27890

      What's new?

      Radiotherapy is well known to protect against local recurrence and improve breast cancer specific survival. Because the common dose also entails potentially carcinogenic scattered radiation to the contralateral breast, the risk of contralateral breast cancer (CBC) after radiotherapy has been extensively investigated, with inconclusive results. This is the first study to investigate whether prognosis after CBC could be affected. The results showed worse tumor characteristics and prognosis for women treated by radiotherapy for the first cancer. The authors concluded that, if confirmed, the findings have important implications both for treatment decisions and for understanding tumor genesis.

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      Prevalence and viral load of 51 genital human papillomavirus types and three subtypes (pages 2395–2403)

      Markus Schmitt, Christophe Depuydt, Ina Benoy, Johannes Bogers, Jerome Antoine, Marc Arbyn, Michael Pawlita and on behalf of the VALGENT Study Group

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27891

      What's new?

      Fifty-one types of human papillomavirus (HPV) can infect the genital mucosa, but little is known about their prevalence. In this analysis, these 51 types, as well as three additional subtypes, were detected in 37.1% of screening samples collected from a Belgian population. Low-level HPV infections were more widespread than previously suggested and were probably overlooked in the past owing to methodological issues. From NIL/M to LSIL and HSIL, high-load Hr-HPV infections increased in frequency, whereas high-load pHr- and Lr-HPV infections peaked in LSIL.

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      Predictions of survival up to 10 years after diagnosis for European women with breast cancer in 2000–2002 (pages 2404–2412)

      Claudia Allemani, Pamela Minicozzi, Franco Berrino, Esther Bastiaannet, Anna Gavin, Jaume Galceran, Alberto Ameijide, Sabine Siesling, Lucia Mangone, Eva Ardanaz, Guy Hédelin, Antonio Mateos, Andrea Micheli, Milena Sant and the EUROCARE Working Group

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27895

      What's new?

      Policy-makers and health-care planners need accurate data on long-term survival to improve cancer control. This Europe-wide study of 10-year survival identified low survival in Eastern Europe for women with breast cancer in 2000-2002, and wide variation by age at diagnosis. Data on stage at diagnosis are crucial for meaningful comparison of population-based survival, and fundamental for improving breast cancer control, but our analyses confirmed that stage data are not collected routinely or consistently

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      Tobacco smoking and risk of multiple myeloma: A meta-analysis of 40 observational studies (pages 2413–2431)

      Theodora Psaltopoulou, Theodoros N. Sergentanis, Nick Kanellias, Prodromos Kanavidis, Evangelos Terpos and Meletios A. Dimopoulos

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27898

      What's new?

      Tobacco smoking has been linked with many cancers but some cancers seem unaffected. To assess the effect of tobacco smoking on multiple myeloma, the authors performed a meta-analysis of 40 existing studies. They found no significant association with ever, current or former smoking. They suggest that a specific resistance mechanism protects multiple myeloma progenitor cells from the negative influence of tobacco smoking.

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      Mortality among offspring of women diagnosed with cancer: A population-based cohort study (pages 2432–2438)

      Helena M. Verkooijen, Joella X. Ang, Jenny Liu, Kamila Czene, Agus Salim and Mikael Hartman

      Version of Record online: 27 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27899

      What's new?

      Exposure to diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for cancer during pregnancy has been linked to adverse effects on offspring, but the relative rarity of these cases has precluded thorough analysis. In this comprehensive investigation of more than 174,800 offspring, maternal cancer was found to have no effect on offspring mortality. Exceptions included children born to women with tobacco-related or hematopoetic cancers and children born around the time of their mother's diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Cancer Therapy

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
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      P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P450 3A act together in restricting the oral bioavailability of paclitaxel (pages 2439–2447)

      Jeroen J.M.A. Hendrikx, Jurjen S. Lagas, Hilde Rosing, Jan H.M. Schellens, Jos H. Beijnen and Alfred H. Schinkel

      Version of Record online: 14 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27912

      What's new?

      Paclitaxel is used for various malignancies but must be administered intravenously because of poor bioavailability following oral administration. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein is a well-known limiting factor in the drug's intestinal uptake, an effect reported here to also be mediated by the enzyme cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). The findings suggest that CYP3A inhibition may augment the effects of ritonavir, which enhances paclitaxel bioavailability, and indicate that further study of the drug in mice could lead to new insight into CYP3A4-mediated paclitaxel metabolism.

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      Interim analysis of START: Study in asia of the combination of TACE (transcatheter arterial chemoembolization) with sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma trial (pages 2448–2458)

      Young-Hwa Chung, Guohong Han, Jung-Hwan Yoon, Jijin Yang, Jianhua Wang, Guo-Liang Shao, Byung Ik Kim, Teng-Yu Lee and Yee Chao

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27925

      What's new?

      Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide, with the highest incidence occurring in regions like the South-east Asian countries. Transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) is currently a first-line, noncurative therapy for HCC while sorafenib is an effective and safe monotherapy in patients with advanced HCC. The current study reports results from a Phase II trial investigating the safety and efficacy of the combination of sorafenib and conventional TACE in patients with intermediate HCC. The results indicate that the combination is safe, efficacious and provides tangible benefits in terms of response to disease and time to progression.

  8. Short Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
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      MAGE-A10 cancer/testis antigen is highly expressed in high-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder carcinomas (pages 2459–2463)

      Chantal Mengus, Elke Schultz-Thater, Julie Coulot, Zeljko Kastelan, Eleonora Goluza, Marijana Coric, Giulio C. Spagnoli and Tvrtko Hudolin

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27914

      What's new?

      Current therapies for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), a prevalent cause of cancer-related death, may be associated with toxicity and suboptimal efficacy. Thus, alternative treatment options are needed. One such option might be specific tumor immunotherapy that generates immune responses against antigens expressed by cancer cells. Here, MAGE-A10, one of the most immunogenic cancer testis antigens (CTA), was found to be highly expressed in high stage/grade NMIBC. The data suggest that this CTA might represent an immunotherapy target in bladder cancers.

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      Known glioma risk loci are associated with glioma with a family history of brain tumours—A case–control gene association study (pages 2464–2468)

      Beatrice Melin, Anna M. Dahlin, Ulrika Andersson, Zhaoming Wang, Roger Henriksson, Göran Hallmans, Melissa L. Bondy, Christoffer Johansen, Maria Feychting, Anders Ahlbom, Cari M. Kitahara, Sophia S. Wang, Avima M. Ruder, Tania Carreón, Mary Ann Butler, Peter D. Inskip, Mark Purdue, Ann W. Hsing, Leah Mechanic, Elizabeth Gillanders, Meredith Yeager, Martha Linet, Stephen J. Chanock, Patricia Hartge and Preetha Rajaraman

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27922

      What's new?

      Genomic research has recently identified seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with an increased risk of glioma. In this study, the authors report that the association between one of these SNPs (rs6010620 in the RTEL1 gene) and glioma is stronger in people with a family history of brain tumor compared to those without such a history. This correlation may help to define genetic factors that increase the risk of developing this form of cancer.

  9. Letters to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Tumor Immunology
    6. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    7. Epidemiology
    8. Cancer Therapy
    9. Short Reports
    10. Letters to the Editor
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      Interaction between treg cells and angiogenesis: A dark double track (page 2469)

      Maria Luisa Gasparri, Filippo Bellati, Chiara Napoletano, Pierluigi Benedetti Panici and Marianna Nuti

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27920

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      Cleft lip, cleft palate, hereditary diffuse gastric cancer and germline mutations in CDH1 (page 2470)

      Patrick R. Benusiglio, Olivier Caron, Emilie Consolino, Pierre Duvillard, Florence Coulet, Martine Blayau and David Malka

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27923

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