You have free access to this content

International Journal of Cancer

Cover image for International Journal of Cancer

15 January 2013

Volume 132, Issue 2

Pages 251–499, E1–E84

  1. Mini Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Colorectal cancer and RASSF family—A special emphasis on RASSF1A (pages 251–258)

      Maria Sofia Fernandes, Fátima Carneiro, Carla Oliveira and Raquel Seruca

      Version of Record online: 14 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27696

  2. Carcinogenesis

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Ikaros is a critical target during simultaneous exposure to X-rays and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in mouse T-cell lymphomagenesis (pages 259–268)

      Shinobu Hirano, Shizuko Kakinuma, Yoshiko Amasaki, Mayumi Nishimura, Tatsuhiko Imaoka, Shinji Fujimoto, Okio Hino and Yoshiya Shimada

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27668

      What's new?

      When mammals are exposed to both radiation and chemical carcinogens, they are far more likely to develop cancer than with either agent alone. To determine the causes of this synergistic effect, the authors examined the types and frequencies of mutations in tumor-associated genes after combined exposure. They found that the tumor-suppressor gene Ikaros plays a central role. Understanding this molecular mechanism may improve risk assessment for patients who have been exposed to multiple environmental carcinogens.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Dietary supplementation with curcumin enhances metastatic growth of Lewis lung carcinoma in mice (pages 269–275)

      Lin Yan

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27683

      What's new?

      Research has suggested that curcumin may reduce malignant formation and growth. In this study, however, dietary supplementation with curcumin in mice was found to enhance metastatic growth of Lewis lung carcinoma. This enhancement was associated with increases in plasma concentrations of angiogenic factors and inflammatory cytokines, which are expressed in many human cancers. The potential role of curcumin in facilitating the development, growth, and spread of malignancies with rapid progression warrants further investigation.

  3. Cancer Cell Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      The role of CXCR3 and CXCR4 in colorectal cancer metastasis (pages 276–287)

      Teppei Murakami, Kenji Kawada, Masayoshi Iwamoto, Masatoshi Akagami, Koya Hida, Yuki Nakanishi, Keitaro Kanda, Mayumi Kawada, Hiroshi Seno, Makoto Mark Taketo and Yoshiharu Sakai

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27670

      What's new?

      The chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CXCR4 play critical roles in determining the metastatic destination of certain cancer cells. In this study, the first to simultaneously investigate CXCR3 and CXCR4, in vivo receptor knockdown was found to reduce colorectal cancer metastasis to lymph nodes, liver, and lung. In addition, activation of CXCR3 was discovered to be synergistic with CXCR4. The findings indicate that chemokine receptors may be promising therapeutic targets against metastasis.

    2. You have free access to this content
      An ex vivo co-culture model system to evaluate stromal–epithelial interactions in breast cancer (pages 288–296)

      T.S. Salameh, T.T. Le, M.B. Nichols, E. Bauer, J. Cheng and I.G. Camarillo

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27672

      What's new?

      Being overweight increases your risk of all kinds of health problems, including cancer, although no one has demonstrated precisely what causes the risk. To investigate the interaction between fat cells and breast tumors, the authors developed a unique co-culture system that mimics the tumor environment in a living body. Fat cells surround the mammary gland in great abundance, yet they remain one of the least-studied types of cell in the tumor environment. By culturing tumor cells together with fat cells, the authors demonstrated that the fat cells stimulated tumor growth. The novel culture design provides a valuable new tool for looking at interactions among the different cell types present in the living system.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Expression profiling shows differential molecular pathways and provides potential new diagnostic biomarkers for colorectal serrated adenocarcinoma (pages 297–307)

      Pablo Conesa-Zamora, José García-Solano, Francisco García-García, María del Carmen Turpin, Javier Trujillo-Santos, Daniel Torres-Moreno, Isabel Oviedo-Ramírez, Rosa Carbonell-Muñoz, Encarnación Muñoz-Delgado, Edith Rodriguez-Braun, Ana Conesa and Miguel Pérez-Guillermo

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27674

      What's new?

      Serrated adenocarcinoma (SAC), a recently recognized colorectal cancer subtype, was shown in a previous study to possess unique molecular and immunohistochemical features. Here, microarray and immunohistochemical analyses of tissue samples from SAC patients with dissimilar environmental and genetic backgrounds validates these features. Fascin1, which is associated with tumor cell invasion, and the antiapoptotic gene hippocalcin were identified as potential biomarkers of SAC, and hence may be valuable immunohistochemical adjuncts in SAC diagnosis.

    4. You have free access to this content
      High-throughput SNP-based authentication of human cell lines (pages 308–314)

      Felipe Castro, Wilhelm G. Dirks, Silke Fähnrich, Agnes Hotz-Wagenblatt, Michael Pawlita and Markus Schmitt

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27675

    5. You have free access to this content
      G-CSF rescues tumor growth and neo-angiogenesis during liver metastasis under host angiopoietin-2 deficiency (pages 315–326)

      Jae Hong Im, Thomas Tapmeier, Lukxmi Balathasan, Annamaria Gal, Sabira Yameen, Sally Hill, Sean Smart, Olivier Noterdaeme, Matthew Kelly, Michael Brady, Weili Fu, Karoline Kruse, Eric J. Bernhard, Hellmut G. Augustin and Ruth J. Muschel

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27677

      What's new?

      Suppression of neo-angiogenesis is a clinically used anti-tumor strategy, with new targets such as angiopoietin-2 (Ang2) being proposed. However, the functions of Ang2 in vascular remodeling, inflammation, and tumor growth are not consistent. This work shows that genetic depletion of host Ang2 unexpectedly enhanced liver metastatic colony vascularity and growth. The more aggressive neo-angiogenesis and tumor growth were associated with VEGF-independent angiogenic mechanisms, including G-CSF production and neutrophil infiltration. Further studies are thus required to assess the effects of pharmacological Ang2 blockade for cancer patients, particularly in the liver.

  4. Infectious Causes of Cancer

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Incidence risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 or more severe lesions is a function of human papillomavirus genotypes and severity of cytological and histological abnormalities in adult Japanese women (pages 327–334)

      Masayoshi Hosaka, Hiromasa Fujita, Sharon JB Hanley, Takayuki Sasaki, Yozo Shirakawa, Mitsuharu Abiko, Masataka Kudo, Masanori Kaneuchi, Hidemichi Watari, Kohkichi Kikuchi and Noriaki Sakuragi

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27680

      What's new?

      HPV causes a precancerous condition called cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, or CIN. Women with CIN could be on a path to cancer, but accurate assessment of the stage of CIN is important for knowing whether to treat it. Low grade CIN is unlikely to become cancer, and need not be treated, but high grade CIN is harder to assess by cytology alone. Could HPV genotyping help with that assessment? The authors examined HPV genotypes in 1400 Japanese women with abnormal cytology and found that HPV genotyping can predict the risk of more severe lesions developing in women with abnormal cervical cytology and CIN.

  5. Tumor Immunology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Successful therapeutic vaccination with integrase defective lentiviral vector expressing nononcogenic human papillomavirus E7 protein (pages 335–344)

      Felicia Grasso, Donatella R.M. Negri, Stefania Mochi, Alessandra Rossi, Armando Cesolini, Andrea Giovannelli, Maria Vincenza Chiantore, Pasqualina Leone, Colomba Giorgi and Andrea Cara

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27676

      What's new?

      Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical cancer in women, as well as other cancers in both women and men. The authors have developed a promising vaccine for the treatment of these cancers, by fusing an HPV protein to a protein called calreticulin. Calreticulin is crucial for the activation of natural killer T cells (NKTs). The vaccine was able to prevent the growth of tumor cells, and to eradicate established tumors in mice. This approach may lead the way to a promising strategy for therapeutic vaccines in human patients.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Induction of CD8 T-cell responses restricted to multiple HLA class I alleles in a cancer patient by immunization with a 20-mer NY-ESO-1f (NY-ESO-1 91-110) peptide (pages 345–354)

      Shingo Eikawa, Kazuhiro Kakimi, Midori Isobe, Kiyotaka Kuzushima, Immanuel Luescher, Yoshihiro Ohue, Kazuhiro Ikeuchi, Akiko Uenaka, Hiroyoshi Nishikawa, Heiichiro Udono, Mikio Oka and Eiichi Nakayama

      Version of Record online: 11 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27682

      What's new?

      An antigen called NY-ESO-1 is expressed by a wide range of human cancers, and has shown promise as a cancer vaccine. In this study, the authors studied a peptide derived from that antigen, and analyzed the cellular and molecular mechanisms that allow the peptide to provoke an immune response. They found that the peptide must be internalized by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in order to yield T-cells that can attack tumours via the NY-ESO-1 antigen. These data increase our understanding of the requirements for an effective therapeutic cancer vaccine. (This section added after initial online publication.)

  6. Early Detection and Diagnosis

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Low-serum GTA-446 anti-inflammatory fatty acid levels as a new risk factor for colon cancer (pages 355–362)

      Shawn A. Ritchie, Jon Tonita, Riaz Alvi, Denis Lehotay, Hoda Elshoni, Su- Myat, James McHattie and Dayan B. Goodenowe

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27673

      What's new?

      This study showed that 86% of CRC patients had low GTA-446 levels. The relative risk of CRC was higher in subjects with low than in those with normal GTA-446 levels. The lack of increased CRC incidence with age among patients with normal GTA-446 levels suggested that low GTA-446 levels could be driving the age increase in CRC incidence rates. GTA-446 testing should be considered as a novel CRC risk-stratification tool.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 in cervical cancer: A meta-analysis (pages 363–373)

      Miaoling Huang, Qing Chen, Jianpeng Xiao, Changhao Liu and Xiaomiao Zhao

      Version of Record online: 3 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27686

      What's new?

      Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) is a common cytologic finding in cervical screening, with only 10–20% of LSIS patients showing significant histologic abnormalities and many of these cytologic changes regressing spontaneously without precancer. To date, however, no markers or molecular tests have adequately enhanced the positive predictive value of LSIL for clinically relevant cervical precancer. The authors showed that testing for high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in women with LSIL is effective in identifying high-grade cervical lesions, thereby avoiding unnecessary referrals to colposcopy and potential over-treatment of non-progressive lesions, especially for women over 40.

  7. Epidemiology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cancer incidence in professional flight crew and air traffic control officers: Disentangling the effect of occupational versus lifestyle exposures (pages 374–384)

      Isabel dos Santos Silva, Bianca De Stavola, Costanza Pizzi, Anthony D. Evans and Sally A. Evans

      Version of Record online: 22 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27612

    2. You have free access to this content
      International trends in the incidence of malignant melanoma 1953–2008—are recent generations at higher or lower risk? (pages 385–400)

      Friederike Erdmann, Joannie Lortet-Tieulent, Joachim Schüz, Hajo Zeeb, Rüdiger Greinert, Eckhard W. Breitbart and Freddie Bray

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27616

    3. You have free access to this content
      Smoking at diagnosis and survival in cancer patients (pages 401–410)

      Graham W. Warren, Karin A. Kasza, Mary E. Reid, K. Michael Cummings and James R. Marshall

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27617

    4. You have free access to this content
      Serum insulin-like, growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (IGFBP-rP1) and endometrial cancer risk in Chinese women (pages 411–416)

      Yan Zhan, Jiamin Wang, Yu Ma, Zhiwei Liu, Haiming Xu, Shiming Lu and Bingjian Lu

      Version of Record online: 18 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27622

    5. You have free access to this content
      Is estrogen plus progestin menopausal hormone therapy safe with respect to endometrial cancer risk? (pages 417–426)

      Britton Trabert, Nicolas Wentzensen, Hannah P. Yang, Mark E. Sherman, Albert R. Hollenbeck, Yikyung Park and Louise A. Brinton

      Version of Record online: 30 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27623

    6. You have free access to this content
      Trends in mortality from leukemia in Europe: An update to 2009 and a projection to 2012 (pages 427–436)

      Paola Bertuccio, Cristina Bosetti, Matteo Malvezzi, Fabio Levi, Liliane Chatenoud, Eva Negri and Carlo La Vecchia

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27624

    7. You have free access to this content
      Red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenomas: A meta-analysis of observational studies (pages 437–448)

      Xiaodong Xu, Enda Yu, Xianhua Gao, Ning Song, Lianjie Liu, Xubiao Wei, Wei Zhang and Chuangang Fu

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27625

    8. You have free access to this content
      EGFR exon 19 in-frame deletion and polymorphisms of DNA repair genes in never-smoking female lung adenocarcinoma patients (pages 449–458)

      Shi-Yi Yang, Tsung-Ying Yang, Yao-Jen Li, Kun-Chieh Chen, Kuo-Meng Liao, Kuo-Hsuan Hsu, Chi-Ren Tsai, Chih-Yi Chen, Chung-Ping Hsu, Jiun-Yi Hsia, Cheng-Yen Chuang, Ying-Huang Tsai, Kuan-Yu Chen, Ming-Shyan Huang, Wu-Chou Su, Yuh-Min Chen, Chao A. Hsiung, Chen-Yang Shen, Gee-Chen Chang, Pan-Chyr Yang and Chien-Jen Chen

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27630

  8. Cancer Therapy

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      SOCS-1 gene delivery cooperates with cisplatin plus pemetrexed to exhibit preclinical antitumor activity against malignant pleural mesothelioma (pages 459–471)

      Kota Iwahori, Satoshi Serada, Minoru Fujimoto, Barry Ripley, Shintaro Nomura, Hiroyuki Mizuguchi, Kazuki Shimada, Tsuyoshi Takahashi, Ichiro Kawase, Tadamitsu Kishimoto and Tetsuji Naka

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27611

    2. You have free access to this content
      Plasma membrane proteomics identifies bone marrow stromal antigen 2 as a potential therapeutic target in endometrial cancer (pages 472–484)

      Takuhei Yokoyama, Takayuki Enomoto, Satoshi Serada, Akiko Morimoto, Shinya Matsuzaki, Yutaka Ueda, Kiyoshi Yoshino, Masami Fujita, Satoru Kyo, Kota Iwahori, Minoru Fujimoto, Tadashi Kimura and Tetsuji Naka

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27679

      What's new?

      In this study, we have used a biotinylation-based approach for cell-surface protein enrichment combined with iTRAQ technology to identify and quantify membrane proteins which might represent potential therapeutic targets of endometrial cancer. A monoclonal antibody targeting BST2, one of the proteins identified in the iTRAQ analysis, have a potent antitumor effect against endometrial cancer both in vitro and in vivo, indicating a strong potential for clinical use of anti-BST2 antibody for endometrial cancer treatment.

    3. You have free access to this content
      An armed oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing thrombospondin-1 has an enhanced in vivo antitumor effect against human gastric cancer (pages 485–494)

      Toshiaki Tsuji, Mikihito Nakamori, Makoto Iwahashi, Masaki Nakamura, Toshiyasu Ojima, Takeshi Iida, Masahiro Katsuda, Keiji Hayata, Yasushi Ino, Tomoki Todo and Hiroki Yamaue

      Version of Record online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27681

      What's new?

      Oncolytic virotherapy using herpes simplex virus (HSV) engineered to destroy tumor cells represents a promising new anticancer strategy. In this study, to enhance the effects of oncolytic HSV, an “armed” virus expressing human thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an antiangiogenic protein, was developed. The armed virus, T-TSP-1, inhibited human gastric cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. The enhanced viral antitumor efficacy observed suggests that T-TSP-1 may be a useful tool in the treatment of gastric cancer.

  9. Letters to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
    2. You have free access to this content
  10. Retraction

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Retraction (page 498)

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27882

      This article corrects:

      Aberrant methylation of Reprimo in human malignancies

      Vol. 115, Issue 4, 503–510, Version of Record online: 7 FEB 2005

    2. You have free access to this content
      Retraction (page 499)

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27883

      This article corrects:

      Aberrant promoter methylation of multiple genes during multistep pathogenesis of colorectal cancers

      Vol. 118, Issue 4, 924–931, Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2005

  11. Cancer Cell Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Inhibitors of vacuolar ATPase proton pumps inhibit human prostate cancer cell invasion and prostate-specific antigen expression and secretion (pages E1–E10)

      Vera Michel, Yamhilette Licon-Munoz, Kristina Trujillo, Marco Bisoffi and Karlett J. Parra

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27811

      What's new?

      Vacuolar adenosine triphosphatases (V-ATPases) pump protons across cell membranes. Within the cell, this increases the acidity of cellular compartments and affects protein processing. When V-ATPases acidify the extracellular space, they can increase tumor-cell motility, proliferation, multi-drug resistance, and metastasis. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of V-ATPase inhibitors on the invasiveness of prostate-cancer cells and on mRNA levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). They found that the cancer cells became less invasive, and expression of PSA mRNA was down-regulated. This indicates that V-ATPases could provide a valuable new therapeutic target.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Loss of PBRM1 expression is associated with renal cell carcinoma progression (pages E11–E17)

      Rafal Pawłowski, Sarah M. Mühl, Tullio Sulser, Wilhelm Krek, Holger Moch and Peter Schraml

      Version of Record online: 3 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27822

      What's new?

      The gene coding for polybromo-1 (PBRM1) is known to have the second-highest mutation frequency in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) tumors, but the clinical and prognostic relevance of these mutations has been uncertain. Using tissue microarrays, the authors found that loss of PBRM1 function is correlated with advanced tumor stage, poor differentiation, and worse patient outcome. These results suggest that PBRM1 is crucial for the suppression of aggressive ccRCC tumors. Given its role in chromatin modification, pathways that are regulated by PBRM1 may also provide new therapeutic targets for ccRCC.

  12. Cancer Genetics

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Aberrant methylation of the PTCH1 gene promoter region in aberrant crypt foci (pages E18–E25)

      Liang Peng, Jingjing Hu, Shujun Li, Zhongqiu Wang, Bingqing Xia, Bo Jiang, Bingsheng Li, Yu Zhang, Jing Wang and Xinying Wang

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27812

      What's new?

      The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an important role in many types of cancer. PTCH1 is a tumor-suppressor gene that induces the activation of the Hh pathway. In this study, the authors investigated epigenetic changes in PTCH1 in colorectal tumors and precancerous cells. They found that altered methylation of PTCH1 correlated with Hh pathway activation in the precancerous cells, and that it was also present in colorectal neoplasms. These findings suggest that aberrant methylation of PTCH1 is an early event in colon carcinogenesis.

  13. Tumor Immunology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      CD8-alpha T-cell infiltration in human papillomavirus-related oropharyngeal carcinoma correlates with improved patient prognosis (pages E26–E36)

      Alain C. Jung, Sébastien Guihard, Sylvie Krugell, Sonia Ledrappier, Alexandra Brochot, Véronique Dalstein, Sylvie Job, Aurélien de Reynies, Georges Noël, Bohdan Wasylyk, Christine Clavel and Joseph Abecassis

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27776

      What's new?

      The immune response plays an important role in the development of tumors associated with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection. This study finds massive infiltration of CD8 T cells in the stroma of HPV+ Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC) as compared to HPV- tumors, a finding that correlates with prolonged survival. The authors speculate that CD8 T cells could be involved in the improved prognosis of HPV-related OSCC and identify CD8alpha as a potential new prognostic biomarker. Their results point to immunotherapy for patients with HPV+ OSCC as a viable treatment option.

  14. Early Detection and Diagnosis

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Diagnostic value of fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography for the detection of metastases in non–small-cell lung cancer patients (pages E37–E47)

      Yihua Wu, Peiwei Li, Honghe Zhang, Yu Shi, Han Wu, Jinjie Zhang, Yufeng Qian, Chao Li and Jun Yang

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27779

      What's new?

      In recent years 18F-FDG PET/CT has emerged as an important method in detecting metastases in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the diagnostic value of 18F-FDG PET/CT. The authors analyzed 56 studies (involving 8699 patients), and found that PET/CT is beneficial in detecting lymph node metastases and extrathoracic metastases. PET/CT confers significantly higher sensitivity and specificity than conventional computed tomography (CT), and higher sensitivity than positron emission tomography (PET) in staging NSCLC.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Circulating U2 small nuclear RNA fragments as a novel diagnostic biomarker for pancreatic and colorectal adenocarcinoma (pages E48–E57)

      Alexander Baraniskin, Stefanie Nöpel-Dünnebacke, Maike Ahrens, Steffen Grann Jensen, Hannah Zöllner, Abdelouahid Maghnouj, Alexandra Wos, Julia Mayerle, Johanna Munding, Dennis Kost, Anke Reinacher-Schick, Sven Liffers, Roland Schroers, Ansgar M. Chromik, Helmut E. Meyer, Waldemar Uhl, Susanne Klein-Scory, Frank U. Weiss, Christian Stephan, Irmgard Schwarte-Waldhoff, Markus M. Lerch, Andrea Tannapfel, Wolff Schmiegel, Claus Lindbjerg Andersen and Stephan A. Hahn

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27791

      What's new?

      Non-coding RNAs hold significant promise as biomarkers for noninvasive early cancer detection, but their utility has not yet been demonstrated. Here, fragments of the non-coding U2 small nuclear RNA (RNU2) were found to be highly preserved and abundant in serum and plasma from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and colorectal cancer patients. Reliable detection of the fragments, particularly for UICC stage II colorectal cancers, suggests that RNU2 may be a valuable screening marker for these cancers.

  15. Epidemiology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Tumor size, node status, grading, HER2 and estrogen receptor status still retain a strong value in patients with operable breast cancer diagnosed in recent years (pages E58–E65)

      Laura Cortesi, Luigi Marcheselli, Valentina Guarneri, Claudia Cirilli, Barbara Braghiroli, Angela Toss, Milena Sant, Guido Ficarra, Pier Franco Conte and Massimo Federico

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27795

      What's new?

      Mammography helps catch breast tumors while they are still treatable. Identifying more sensitive prognostic factors that could be used during the course of treatment would help clinicians prevent recurrence and avoid unnecessary therapies. In this paper, the authors collected clinical, laboratory, pathological, and therapeutic information on almost 5,000 cases of operable breast cancer to find out which factors predicted successful recovery. They developed a prognostic index based on five variables that can help clinicians determine whether a patient's disease is likely to be helped by a particular drug, making it worth the toxic side effects.

  16. Cancer Therapy

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Tumor Immunology
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    10. Letters to the Editor
    11. Retraction
    12. Cancer Cell Biology
    13. Cancer Genetics
    14. Tumor Immunology
    15. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    16. Epidemiology
    17. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Overall survival benefits for irinotecan-containing regimens as first-line treatment for advanced gastric cancer: An updated meta-analysis of ten randomized controlled trials (pages E66–E73)

      Wei-Xiang Qi, Zan Shen, Feng Lin, Yuan-Jue Sun, Da-Liu Min, Li-Na Tang, Ai-Na He and Yang Yao

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27775

      What's new?

      This updated meta-analysis provided strong evidence for a survival benefit of irinotecan-containing regimen as first line treatment for advanced gastric cancer. A clear advantage of irinotecan-containing over non irinotecan-containing regimen had not been established. These results should help inform decisions about patient management and design of future trials.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Overcoming erlotinib resistance with tailored treatment regimen in patient-derived xenografts from naïve Asian NSCLC patients (pages E74–E84)

      Mengmeng Yang, Baoen Shan, Qiaoxia Li, Xiaoming Song, Jie Cai, Jianyun Deng, Likun Zhang, Zhenjian Du, Junjie Lu, Taiping Chen, Jean-Pierre Wery, Yiyou Chen and Qixiang Li

      Version of Record online: 3 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27813

      What's new?

      EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), erlotinib and gefitinib, are the two approved treatments for NSCLC adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients with activating EGFR mutations that occur more frequently in non-smoking Asian female patients. However, drug resistance rapidly developed with two dominant genotypes: EGFR T790M “gatekeeper” mutation and c-met gene amplification . Patient derived xenograft (PDX) mimics human cancers and has been reported to be predictive of drug effects in patients. The present study established a cohort of NSCLC, including non-ADC PDX models of Asian origin containing EGFR mutations. Some of the models are found to be resistant to TKIs with classic mechanisms as seen in the clinics. We demonstrated that two existing target therapies could be tailored to overcome these resistances: 1) crizotinib, a c-MET inhibitor, was effective in overcoming resistance caused by c-met gene amplification, particularly when combined with erlotinib; 2) cetuximab, an EGFR inhibitor of distinct mechanism of action, was potent against EGFR T790M mutant. Our observation could therefore have important and practical implication treating EGFR TKI resistant patients in the clinic.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION