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International Journal of Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 133 Issue 11

1 December 2013

Volume 133, Issue 11

Pages 2511–2757

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      Overdiagnosis of breast cancer (page 2511)

      Anthony B. Miller

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28258

  2. Mini Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      Genome-wide analyses on high-grade osteosarcoma: Making sense of a genomically most unstable tumor (pages 2512–2521)

      Marieke L. Kuijjer, Pancras C.W. Hogendoorn and Anne-Marie Cleton-Jansen

      Version of Record online: 16 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28124

  3. Carcinogenesis

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      Heterogeneous expression and functional relevance of the ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 in melanoma (pages 2522–2532)

      Jens Wulfänger, Katharina Biehl, Anja Tetzner, Peter Wild, Kristian Ikenberg, Stefanie Meyer and Barbara Seliger

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28278

      What's new?

      The ubiquitin-specific hydrolase L1 (UCHL1) is an enzyme that protects ubiquitinated proteins from degradation and recycles ubiquitin moieties. UCHL1 is mainly expressed in the brain but has been associated with different tumors outside the brain. Here, the authors analyzed the expression pattern of UCHL1 in melanoma cell lines and primary tumors. They report a widespread loss or reduced expression of UCHL1 in melanoma cells, which was directly correlated with promoter DNA hypermethylation. The subset of melanoma cells, which still expressed UCHL1, showed altered growth properties and tolerances against reactive oxygen species as compared to UCHL1-negative cells. The authors propose that UCHL1 may function as a new diagnostic biomarker or therapeutic target for the treatment of UCHL1-positive melanomas.

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      Calcium inhibits promotion by hot dog of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-induced mucin-depleted foci in rat colon (pages 2533–2541)

      Raphaelle L. Santarelli, Nathalie Naud, Sylviane Taché, Françoise Guéraud, Jean-Luc Vendeuvre, Lin Zhou, Muhammad M. Anwar, Sidney S. Mirvish, Denis E. Corpet and Fabrice H.F. Pierre

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28286

      What's new?

      The link between dietary intake of processed meats and colorectal cancer risk is intriguing but in need of support from experimental studies, such as the one reported here. Rats pretreated with the cancer-inducing agent 1,2-dimethylhydrazine and fed a diet of store-bought cured meat experienced an increase in the number and size of precancerous lesions (mucin-depleted foci) in the colon. Hot dog intake was associated with a marked increase in lesions, though the addition of calcium carbonate to the hot dog diet suppressed the promoting effect. Fecal nitroso-compounds correlated with promotion of carcinogenesis and are potential biomarkers in humans.

  4. Cancer Cell Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      Silencing the mannose 6-phosphate/IGF-II receptor differentially affects tumorigenic properties of normal breast epithelial cells (pages 2542–2550)

      Nicole J. Caixeiro, Janet L. Martin and Carolyn D. Scott

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28276

      What's new?

      Loss of the growth-regulating receptor M6P/IGF-IIR occurs in a variety of cancers and is suspected of contributing to tumor growth. Whether these changes are of consequence for tumorigenesis, however, is unclear. This report shows that M6P/IGF-IIR silencing in normal breast cells can produce certain characteristics of tumorigenesis, including proliferation and motility, but does not affect anchorage-independent growth. Acquisition of tumorigenic characteristics in normal and oncogenically transformed breast epithelial cells occurred through both IGF-II-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The findings suggest that while loss of M6P/IGF-IIR alone is insufficient for tumorigenesis, it is capable of enhancing tumorigenic potential in transformed cells.

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      p14ARF induces apoptosis via an entirely caspase-3-dependent mitochondrial amplification loop (pages 2551–2562)

      Ana Milojkovic, Philipp G. Hemmati, Annika Müer, Tim Overkamp, Cindrilla Chumduri, Reiner U. Jänicke, Bernd Gillissen and Peter T. Daniel

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28279

      What's new?

      The mechanisms underlying the induction of apoptotic cell death or cell cycle arrest by the tumor suppressor p14ARF remain unclear. Here, the authors showed that p53 wild-type MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells failed to undergo apoptosis but entered cycle arrest upon p14ARF expression. Inhibition of p14ARF-induced cell cycle arrest interfered with induction of the p53 pathway and triggered an entirely caspase-3-dependent apoptotic cell death program involving mitochondrial apoptosis events, with caspase-3 serving as an upstream regulator. This is surprising, as caspase-3 is generally believed to act downstream, and offers potential for novel therapies targeting the caspase/inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) rheostat.

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      Influence of soluble or matrix-bound isoforms of vascular endothelial growth factor-A on tumor response to vascular-targeted strategies (pages 2563–2576)

      Simon Akerman, Matthew Fisher, Rachel A. Daniel, Diane Lefley, Constantino C. Reyes-Aldasoro, Sarah Jane Lunt, Sheila Harris, Meit Bjorndahl, Leigh J. Williams, Helen Evans, Paul R. Barber, Vivien E. Prise, Borivoj Vojnovic, Chryso Kanthou and Gillian M. Tozer

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28281

      What's new?

      Targeting the blood supply of tumors remains an important therapeutic strategy in the fight against cancer. Strategic approaches are aimed at vascular “normalization” primarily using compounds that interfere with the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway or vascular “disruption” using so-called vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) agents. Using mice carrying tumors expressing specific isoforms of VEGF the authors show that the soluble 120 amino acids VEGF isoform is associated with susceptibility to vascular normalization induced by VEGFR-2-targeting treatment. Furthermore, normalization rendered tumor blood vessels resistant to subsequent treatment with an archetypal vascular disrupting agent, CA4P. These results suggest typing VEGF isoform expression in tumors may be useful to predict the response to vascular-targeted therapy in patients.

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      Notch3 is activated by chronic hypoxia and contributes to the progression of human prostate cancer (pages 2577–2586)

      Giovanna Danza, Claudia Di Serio, Maria Raffaella Ambrosio, Niccolò Sturli, Giuseppe Lonetto, Fabiana Rosati, Bruno Jim Rocca, Giuseppina Ventimiglia, Maria Teresa del Vecchio, Igor Prudovsky, Niccolò Marchionni and Francesca Tarantini

      Version of Record online: 26 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28293

      What's new?

      Hypoxia can play an important role in tumor progression, by altering the expression of a number of regulatory genes. In this study, the authors found that hypoxia can lead to the activation of Notch3 in prostate cancer (PC) tumor cells, by altering the membrane structure of these cells. Notch3 expression correlates with tumor grade in human cancers. The Notch signaling pathway may therefore be a promising target for adjuvant therapy in PC. Immunostaining for Notch3 may also provide a useful biomarker for identifying tumors with a poor prognosis.

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      TACE-dependent TGFα shedding drives triple-negative breast cancer cell invasion (pages 2587–2595)

      Orsi Giricz, Veronica Calvo, Esther A. Peterson, Christiane M. Abouzeid and Paraic A. Kenny

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28295

      What's new?

      While expression of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) has been frequently associated with basal-like and triple-negative breast cancer, the mechanism by which it is activated remains unclear. In this study, Giricz and colleagues implicate TGF-alpha as the most strongly up-regulated ligand for the EGFR receptor in such tumors and demonstrate that TACE-dependent proteolytic shedding of TGF-alpha makes an important contribution to the invasion and growth of triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. The data suggest that blocking TGF-alpha/EGFR signaling using inhibitors of either TACE or EGFR may have clinical utility in patients whose tumors are dependent on this autocrine loop.

  5. Cancer Genetics

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      Distinct molecular profiles in Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian carcinomas (pages 2596–2608)

      Anni Niskakoski, Sippy Kaur, Laura Renkonen-Sinisalo, Heini Lassus, Heikki J. Järvinen, Jukka-Pekka Mecklin, Ralf Bützow and Päivi Peltomäki

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28287

      What's new?

      Lynch syndrome (LS), the second most common cause of hereditary ovarian cancer, is distinct clinically and histologically from sporadic ovarian carcinoma, though the molecular basis for these differences remains unexplained. Here, a novel molecular profile, characterized by normal p53 expression, lack of KRAS mutation, mismatch repair deficiency, and unique DNA hypermethylation and hypomethylation, is described for LS-associated ovarian carcinoma. The LS profile differs markedly from molecular profiles of sporadic tumors and may account for the relatively high survival rate observed among LS patients. The findings could inform strategies for tailored management and surveillance of LS-associated ovarian cancer.

  6. Tumor Immunology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      Macrophages in T cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma strongly express metal-binding proteins and show a bi-activated phenotype (pages 2609–2618)

      Sylvia Hartmann, Thomas Tousseyn, Claudia Döring, Patricia Flüchter, Holger Hackstein, An Herreman, Maurilio Ponzoni, Chris de Wolf-Peeters, Fabio Facchetti, Randy D. Gascoyne, Ralf Küppers, Christian Steidl and Martin-Leo Hansmann

      Version of Record online: 29 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28273

      What's new?

      If a malignant tumor has abundant macrophage infiltration, it often indicates a poor prognosis. THRLBCL, or T-cell/histiocyte rich large B cell lymphoma, is a rare, aggressive B cell lymphoma characterized by a high macrophage content. This study presents data from a gene-expression analysis of microdissected histiocytes from THRLBCL, as well as from other neoplastic and reactive conditions. The authors found that histiocytes from THRLBCL present unique features, such as the expression of metal-binding proteins. These include several members of the metallothionein family. This increased expression may be diagnostically useful.

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      Circulating nucleosomes and immunogenic cell death markers HMGB1, sRAGE and DNAse in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer undergoing chemotherapy (pages 2619–2630)

      Christin Wittwer, Stefan Boeck, Volker Heinemann, Michael Haas, Petra Stieber, Dorothea Nagel and Stefan Holdenrieder

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28294

      What's new?

      Serum biomarkers are urgently needed for prognosis and treatment monitoring in pancreatic cancer (PC). In this study, the authors assessed biomarkers of cell death that are known to affect the immune response against tumor cells. They found that high serum levels of nucleosomes and the protein HMGB1 (high mobility group box-), as well as low serum levels of sRAGE (soluble receptor of advanced glycation end products), were associated with a poorer response to therapy and poorer prognosis. These indicators may therefore provide useful tools for early estimation of therapeutic response and prognosis in advanced PC.

  7. Early Detection and Diagnosis

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      Using microRNA profiling in urine samples to develop a non-invasive test for bladder cancer (pages 2631–2641)

      Lourdes Mengual, Juan José Lozano, Mercedes Ingelmo-Torres, Cristina Gazquez, María José Ribal and Antonio Alcaraz

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28274

      What's new?

      Accurate urinary tests to detect urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) would improve patients' quality of life and outcome. Here, in the first global urine miRNA profiling study of UCC patients, the authors provide a list of dysregulated miRNAs that are candidate clinical biomarkers for the non-invasive assessment of UCC. Furthermore, they describe miRNA panels consisting of a modest number of miRNAs that provide high UCC diagnostic and prognostic accuracy. Although clinical trials are needed to validate the data, the findings open the door to the possibility of implementing an accurate and reliable system for the non-invasive assessment of UCC in clinical routine.

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      Unbalanced estrogen metabolism in thyroid cancer (pages 2642–2649)

      Muhammad Zahid, Whitney Goldner, Cheryl L. Beseler, Eleanor G. Rogan and Ercole L. Cavalieri

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28275

      What's new?

      Women with thyroid cancer have more estrogen-DNA adducts than women without, suggesting that the structures play a role in cancer development. Previous studies have suggested a link between breast cancer and thyroid cancer. When estrogens are metabolized, the resulting chemicals can bind to DNA; some of these metabolites damage the purine bases and cause mutations which lead to cancer. This study showed that women with thyroid cancer have a higher proportion of these DNA-damaging metabolites.

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      HtrA1 in human urothelial bladder cancer: A secreted protein and a potential novel biomarker (pages 2650–2661)

      Teresa Lorenzi, Maria Lorenzi, Emma Altobelli, Daniela Marzioni, Emanuela Mensà, Alexia Quaranta, Francesca Paolinelli, Manrico Morroni, Roberta Mazzucchelli, Antonio De Luca, Antonio Domenico Procopio, Alfonso Baldi, Giovanni Muzzonigro, Rodolfo Montironi and Mario Castellucci

      Version of Record online: 9 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28280

      What's new?

      Four-fifths of urothelial bladder cancer patients suffer a relapse of disease within one to two years of initial treatment, a problem that could be alleviated by advances in biomarker-based early stage screening. This investigation introduces one possible biomarker, the secreted serine protease HtrA1. While previous studies have suggested that HtrA1 may function as a tumor suppressor in certain solid tumors, this report indicates that a reduction in its expression may be an early, highly sensitive and specific biomarker particularly for urothelial bladder cancer. The recoverability of HtrA1 in urine would allow for a noninvasive means of routine screening.

      Corrected by:

      Errata: Erratum

      Vol. 137, Issue 8, E19, Version of Record online: 7 AUG 2015

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      Mass profiling of serum to distinguish mice with pancreatic cancer induced by a transgenic Kras mutation (pages 2662–2671)

      James R. Hocker, Altaf Mohammed, Christopher E. Aston, Misty Brewer, Stan A. Lightfoot, Chinthalapally V. Rao and Jay S. Hanas

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28285

      What's new?

      The ability to reliably identify disease-related patterns of biomarker expression in serum could lead to advances in the early detection of pancreatic cancer. This report describes a novel electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) platform with the ability to distinguish between individual control mice and individual mice with PanIN lesions or pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. The oncogenic Kras mutation employed in the mouse model is characteristic of most human pancreatic tumors and is one of the earliest genetic events of the disease. In addition to aiding early detection, the ESI-MS approach could also influence the development of novel therapeutic interventions.

  8. Epidemiology

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      A prospective analysis of telomere length and pancreatic cancer in the alpha-tocopherol beta-carotene cancer (ATBC) prevention study (pages 2672–2680)

      Shannon M. Lynch, Jacqueline M. Major, Richard Cawthon, Stephanie J. Weinstein, Jarmo Virtamo, Qing Lan, Nathaniel Rothman, Demetrius Albanes and Rachael Z. Stolzenberg-Solomon

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28272

      What's new?

      This is the first prospective study to examine the association between blood leukocyte telomere length and pancreatic cancer. In tumor, longer telomeres have been observed in advanced pancreatic cancer and risk factors for pancreatic cancer (cigarette smoke and diabetes) are known to affect telomere length. Based on a nested case-control study in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study cohort of male smokers, here the authors found that longer blood leukocyte telomeres were significantly associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk. The results add insight into the role of telomeres in pancreatic cancer, a disease that can benefit from the identification of early detection markers.

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      HPV self-sampling or the Pap-smear: A randomized study among cervical screening nonattenders from lower socioeconomic groups in France (pages 2681–2687)

      H. Sancho-Garnier, C. Tamalet, P. Halfon, F.X. Leandri, L. Le Retraite, K. Djoufelkit, P. Heid, P. Davies and L. Piana

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28283

      What's new?

      Some women don't go in for regular Pap smears. One idea to screen this population for HPV is to have them collect their own vaginal specimens and send them in for testing. Far more women participated in this self-sampling program than responded to an invitation for a free Pap smear. However, this study reports that even when they test positive for HPV, these women mostly don't go in for follow-up, which lowers the effectiveness of the system.

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      Smoking addiction and the risk of upper-aerodigestive-tract cancer in a multicenter case–control study (pages 2688–2695)

      Yuan-Chin Amy Lee, Daniela Zugna, Lorenzo Richiardi, Franco Merletti, Manuela Marron, Wolfgang Ahrens, Hermann Pohlabeln, Pagona Lagiou, Dimitrios Trichopoulos, Antonio Agudo, Xavier Castellsague, Jaroslav Betka, Ivana Holcatova, Kristina Kjaerheim, Gary J. Macfarlane, Tatiana V. Macfarlane, Renato Talamini, Luigi Barzan, Cristina Canova, Lorenzo Simonato, David I. Conway, Patricia A. McKinney, Peter Thomson, Ariana Znaor, Claire M. Healy, Bernard E. McCartan, Paolo Boffetta, Paul Brennan and Mia Hashibe

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28288

      What's new?

      Previous studies have clearly shown dose-response relationships between tobacco/alcohol use and the risk of upper-aerodigestive-tract (UADT) cancers, but these studies have focused only on the variables of frequency and duration of use. In this study, the authors asked whether addiction to smoking might be an independent risk factor. They found that addiction was indeed associated with UADT cancer risk among current smokers. This addiction-cancer association suggests that it is important to include questions that elicit information regarding smoking addiction when accounting for smoking effect through questionnaire information.

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      Birth outcomes among offspring of adult cancer survivors: A population-based study (pages 2696–2705)

      Hanne Stensheim, Kari Klungsøyr, Rolv Skjærven, Tom Grotmol and Sophie D. Fosså

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28292

      What's new?

      As more adults survive cancer and subsequently have children, more people are asking how the disease and its treatment impact those children. This study compared birth outcomes among male and female cancer survivors with those of a control group. They looked at preterm birth, low birth weight and other factors, and also segregated the data depending on whether the woman had a child before developing cancer, or whether the post-diagnosis child was her first. They found an increased risk of preterm birth for all female survivors, and increased risk of low birth weight, caesarian section, and pre-eclampsia in only the women who had a prior child. No significant differences were found among the offspring of male survivors.

  9. Cancer Therapy

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      CD34+/CD38 acute myelogenous leukemia cells aberrantly express Aurora kinase A (pages 2706–2719)

      Jing Yang, Takayuki Ikezoe, Chie Nishioka, Atsuya Nobumoto, Keiko Udaka and Akihito Yokoyama

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28277

      What's new?

      Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is orchestrated by a subset of self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSCs). CD34+/CD38 cells enrich for LSCs and are resistant to conventional anti-leukemia agents. This study reports that CD34+/CD38 AML cells expressed larger amounts of Aurora kinase A (AURKA) than their CD34+/CD38+ counterparts and CD34+ HSPCs. AURKA inhibition by MLN8237 or a shRNA significantly inhibited proliferation, impaired self-renewal capability, and induced apoptosis of CD34+/CD38 AML cells. It also significantly impaired CD34+/CD38 AML cell engraftment in severely immunocompromised mice and appeared to prolong mice survival. AURKA is thus a promising molecular target to eradicate chemotherapy-resistant CD34+/CD38 AML cells.

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      Serum fibrinogen is an independent prognostic factor in operable nonsmall cell lung cancer (pages 2720–2725)

      Liming Sheng, Min Luo, Xiaojiang Sun, Nengming Lin, Weimin Mao and Dan Su

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28284

      What's new?

      Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have remarkably different survival outcomes, even among cases with similar stage and histologic classifications. Despite initial promise, several biomarkers have failed to provide prognostic value in the clinic. In this study, the authors asked whether fibrinogen might serve as a more useful biomarker. (In addition to its role in inflammation and wound healing, fibrinogen can influence cancer-cell growth, tumor progression, and metastasis.) The study found that preoperative serum fibrinogen levels may provide a novel, independent prognostic biomarker in operable NSCLC.

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      Targeting breast cancer-initiating/stem cells with melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (pages 2726–2736)

      Sujit K. Bhutia, Swadesh K. Das, Belal Azab, Mitchell E. Menezes, Paul Dent, Xiang-Yang Wang, Devanand Sarkar and Paul B. Fisher

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28289

      What's new?

      Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells, are the small population of cells within a tumor that promote the growth and spread of the tumor. These self-renewing cells produce high levels of proteins that thwart apoptosis, such as Bcl-2, NF-κB, and Akt. In this paper, the authors investigated a protein, MDA-7/IL-24, which has been shown to slow tumor growth and induce apoptosis. They found that it specifically targets the cancer stem cells and stops them from self-renewing, which may help prevent recurrence of the disease.

      Corrected by:

      Errata: Erratum

      Vol. 139, Issue 1, E3, Version of Record online: 15 APR 2016

  10. Short Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      New findings of kinase switching in gastrointestinal stromal tumor under imatinib using phosphoproteomic analysis (pages 2737–2743)

      Tsuyoshi Takahashi, Satoshi Serada, Maiko Ako, Minoru Fujimoto, Yasuaki Miyazaki, Rie Nakatsuka, Takayuki Ikezoe, Akihito Yokoyama, Takahiro Taguchi, Kazuki Shimada, Yukinori Kurokawa, Makoto Yamasaki, Hiroshi Miyata, Kiyokazu Nakajima, Shuji Takiguchi, Masaki Mori, Yuichiro Doki, Tetsuji Naka and Toshirou Nishida

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28282

      What's new?

      While the targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib can significantly improve two-year survival rates for patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST), primary and secondary resistance mutations often limit its benefits. This study of the human GIST-T1 cell line suggests that imatinib-induced increases in tyrosine phosphorylation of FYN kinase and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) may be responsible for mediating some instances of imatinib resistance and therefore may be potential targets for killing persistent tumor cells and overcoming resistance. The findings also indicate that iTRAQ-based quantitative phosphotyrosine-focused proteomic analysis is a useful way of screening for phosphoproteins associated with drug resistance.

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      Meat and heme iron intake and esophageal adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study (pages 2744–2750)

      Paula Jakszyn, Leila Luján-Barroso, Antonio Agudo, H. Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, Esther Molina, Mª José Sánchez, Ana Fonseca-Nunes, Peter D Siersema, Amalia Matiello, Rosario Tumino, Calogero Saieva, Valeria Pala, Paolo Vineis, Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault, Antoine Racine, Nadie Bastide, Ruth C. Travis, Kay-Tee Khaw, Elio Riboli, Neil Murphy, Anne-Claire Vergnaud, Antonia Trichopoulou, Elissavet Valanou, EDespina Oikonomidou, Elisabete Weiderpass, Guri Skeie, Dorthe Johansen, Björn Lindkvist, Mattias Johansson, Talita Duarte-Salles, Heinz Freisling, Aurelio Barricarte, Jose Mª Huerta, Pilar Amiano, Anne Tjonneland, Kim Overvad, Tilman Kuehn, Verena Grote, Heiner Boeing, Petra HM Peeters and Carlos A González

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28291

      What's new?

      Previous results have shown that eating red meat can increase one's risk of developing certain cancers, including esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). That work included few cases of EAC, however. This study expands on those findings by investigating the effect of eating different kinds of meats and includes a larger number of esophageal cancer cases. Using a questionnaire, they assessed the amount of processed and unprocessed red or white meat consumed by individuals, including 137 EAC patients. They also estimated the amount of heme iron consumed based on the amount and types of meat eaten by the study subject. The analysis shows that consumption of processed meat and heme iron appear to be associated with higher risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  11. Letters to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Mini Review
    4. Carcinogenesis
    5. Cancer Cell Biology
    6. Cancer Genetics
    7. Tumor Immunology
    8. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    9. Epidemiology
    10. Cancer Therapy
    11. Short Reports
    12. Letters to the Editor
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      Failure to account for selection-bias (pages 2751–2753)

      Mette Kalager, Magnus Løberg, Vinjar M. Fønnebø and Michael Bretthauer

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28244

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      Overdiagnosis of breast cancer in Norway: What have the authors adjusted for? (pages 2754–2755)

      Per-Henrik Zahl, Pål Suhrke and Karsten Juhl Jørgensen

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28248

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      Response to comments by Kalager et al. and Zahl et al. (pages 2756–2757)

      Ragnhild Sørum Falk, Solveig Hofvind, Per Skaane and Tor Haldorsen

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28247

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