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International Journal of Cancer

Cover image for International Journal of Cancer

15 October 2013

Volume 133, Issue 8

Pages 1765–2012

  1. Mini Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Epidemiology
    7. Cancer Therapy
    8. Short Report
    9. Letters to the Editor
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      Associations of Lys939Gln and Ala499Val polymorphisms of the XPC gene with cancer susceptibility: A meta-analysis (pages 1765–1775)

      Jing He, Ting-Yan Shi, Mei-Ling Zhu, Meng-Yun Wang, Qiao-Xin Li and Qing-Yi Wei

      Version of Record online: 8 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28089

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      Obesity, adipokines and hepatocellular carcinoma (pages 1776–1783)

      Xiao-Feng Duan, Peng Tang, Qiang Li and Zhen-Tao Yu

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28105

  2. Cancer Cell Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Epidemiology
    7. Cancer Therapy
    8. Short Report
    9. Letters to the Editor
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      Platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase induces MMP9 expression and cellular invasion via activation of PI3K/Akt/NF-κB (pages 1784–1791)

      Ashok-kumar Dilly, Prasanna Ekambaram, Yande Guo, Yinlong Cai, Stephanie C. Tucker, Rafael Fridman, Mustapha Kandouz and Kenneth V. Honn

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28165

      What's new?

      The worst human prostate cancers frequently have elevated levels of an enzyme, 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX). Earlier work has shown that 12-LOX assists with invasion and metastasis, but it's not clear how it does so. In this study, the authors demonstrate that extra 12-LOX in prostate cancer cells boosts matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) by activating the PI3K/Akt/NFkB pathway. Even without overexpression of 12-LOX, simply adding its product, 12(S)-HETE, to the cells produced the same increase in MMP9. Thus it seems likely that suppressing MMP9 by blocking the PI3K/Akt/NFkB pathway could effectively halt the tumor angiogenesis driven by 12-LOX.

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      Involvement of Gpr125 in the myeloid sarcoma formation induced by cooperating MLL/AF10(OM-LZ) and oncogenic KRAS in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model (pages 1792–1802)

      Jen-Fen Fu, Tzung-Hai Yen, Yu Chen, Ying-Jung Huang, Cheng-Lung Hsu, Der-Cherng Liang and Lee-Yung Shih

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28195

      What's new?

      The molecular mechanisms underlying the formation of myeloid sarcoma (MS)—a non-hepatosplenic extramedullary tumor mass made of myeloid leukemia cells—remain largely unknown. In this study, the authors established a mouse model that supports the clinical observation that cooperation between MLL rearrangement MLL/AF10 and oncogenic N/K-RAS induces myeloid sarcoma formation. They further demonstrated that up-regulation of the adhesion G-protein coupled receptor Gpr125 contributes to leukemia cell adhesion and tumor mass formation. The involvement of Gpr125 in the MLL/AF10(OM-LZ) and KRASG12C-induced myeloid sarcoma formation in adipose tissues has not been reported before.

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      Knockout of the tetraspanin Cd9 in the TRAMP model of de novo prostate cancer increases spontaneous metastases in an organ-specific manner (pages 1803–1812)

      Ben T. Copeland, Matthew J. Bowman, Claude Boucheix and Leonie K. Ashman

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28204

      What's new?

      The ability to distinguish between prostate tumors that are more or less likely to spread could facilitate decisions regarding treatment options for patients. A promising marker for such distinction is the tetraspanin protein CD9, which in experimental studies has been linked to metastasis. Here, Cd9 genetic ablation in the well-characterized transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) model reveals an association between loss of Cd9 expression and increased incidence of metastases to the liver but not the lung. In contrast, Cd9 ablation did not affect primary prostate tumor initiation. The findings suggest that Cd9 acts as a suppressor of metastasis.

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      Concurrent inhibition of PI3K and mTORC1/mTORC2 overcomes resistance to rapamycin induced apoptosis by down-regulation of Mcl-1 in mantle cell lymphoma (pages 1813–1824)

      Anja Müller, Chuanbing Zang, Cindrilla Chumduri, Bernd Dörken, Peter T. Daniel and Christian W. Scholz

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28206

      What's new?

      Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare and highly chemoresistant disease. Here, it is shown that MCL cell survival is regulated by the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 homologue Mcl-1, targeting of which by obatoclax (a BH3 mimetic), by RNA interference, or by NVP-BEZ235 (an mTORC1/2 inhibitor) was found to trigger apoptotic cell death. In contrast, despite the involvement of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin induced proliferation arrest but not death in MCL cells. The findings introduce a possible strategy by which MCL treatment and the efficacy of mTOR targeted therapies could be improved.

  3. Cancer Genetics

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Epidemiology
    7. Cancer Therapy
    8. Short Report
    9. Letters to the Editor
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      Prognostic and predictive value of estrogen receptor 1 expression in completely resected non-small cell lung cancer (pages 1825–1831)

      Wolfgang Michael Brueckl, Salah-Eddin Al-Batran, Joachim Hans Ficker, Silke Claas, Akin Atmaca, Arndt Hartmann, Ralf Joachim Rieker and Ralph Markus Wirtz

      Version of Record online: 7 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28209

      What's new?

      While non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients are at a high risk of tumor relapse in spite of curative resection and also adjuvant chemotherapy, some remain relapse-free even with no adjuvant chemotherapy. Prognostic and predictive markers are therefore of utmost importance for an adequate therapeutic strategy. The authors show for the first time that estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1) expression in NSCLC is of prognostic value and might be predictive of the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy. If the results are confirmed, ESR1 expression could help stratify NSCLC patients into different prognostic groups and inform decision-making regarding the use of adjuvant chemotherapy.

  4. Infectious Causes of Cancer

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Epidemiology
    7. Cancer Therapy
    8. Short Report
    9. Letters to the Editor
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      Markers of HPV infection and survival in patients with head and neck tumors (pages 1832–1839)

      Eva Koslabova, Eva Hamsikova, Martina Salakova, Jan Klozar, Eva Foltynova, Eva Salkova, Eliska Rotnaglova, Viera Ludvikova and Ruth Tachezy

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28194

      What's new?

      Do changes in the amount of HPV DNA detected orally indicate whether cancer will recur? In this paper, the authors collected oral rinses from 142 patients before and after treatment. They found that the presence of HPV in the oral rinse correlated with HPV DNA detected in the tumor tissues, but that by one year after treatment, the oral rinse usually came back negative for HPV despite the continuing presence of HPV in the tumor cells. On the other hand, the authors did find that lingering HPV antibodies in the bloodstream seemed to correlate with tumor recurrence, suggesting that antibody testing could be a good prognostic indicator in patients with HPV-positive tumors.

  5. Epidemiology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Epidemiology
    7. Cancer Therapy
    8. Short Report
    9. Letters to the Editor
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      Prospective study of genital human papillomaviruses and nonmelanoma skin cancer (pages 1840–1845)

      Kristin Andersson, Tapio Luostarinen, Anna Söderlund Strand, Hilde Langseth, Randi E. Gislefoss, Ola Forslund, Michael Pawlita, Tim Waterboer and Joakim Dillner

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28188

      What's new?

      Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a well-known cause of cervical cancer. In addition, an association with skin cancer has been proposed. In a large prospective study, the authors found that baseline seropositivity for HPV types 16 and 18 was associated with increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma of the skin (SCC) and with other non-melanoma-type skin cancer, but not basal cell carcinoma. Surprisingly, only a very small proportion of skin tumors isolated from seropositive subjects harbored the DNA of these high-risk HPV types known to cause cervical carcinoma, raising the question whether concomitant genital HPV infection confounded the results. Interestingly, HPV DNA was successfully isolated from perianal SCCs, supporting the model that these tumors are uniquely caused by high-risk-type HPV infection.

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      Multiple pesticide exposures and the risk of multiple myeloma in Canadian men (pages 1846–1858)

      Linda Kachuri, Paul A Demers, Aaron Blair, John J Spinelli, Manisha Pahwa, John R McLaughlin, Punam Pahwa, James A Dosman and Shelley A Harris

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28191

      What's new?

      This study is the first to investigate the risk of multiple myeloma from exposure to multiple pesticides using two distinct metrics: number of pesticides and days per year of pesticide use. Focusing on multiple pesticide exposures is important because it more accurately reflects how exposures occur in agricultural settings. Although the overall pattern was complex, increased risks observed for certain pesticide groups and individual compounds suggest that these may be risk factors for multiple myeloma.

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      Changes in treatment patterns and their influence on long-term survival in patients with stages I–III gastric cancer in The Netherlands (pages 1859–1866)

      A.E. Dassen, J.L. Dikken, C.J.H. van de Velde, M.W.J.M. Wouters, K. Bosscha and V.E.P.P. Lemmens

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28192

      What's new?

      Studies in the early 2000s in the Netherlands revealed that radiation therapy and chemotherapy given after or at the time of surgery could reduce the chances of gastric cancer recurrence. These findings led to significant changes nationwide in guidelines for gastric cancer treatment, the impacts of which were evaluated here, based on Netherlands Cancer Registry data. The data show exponential growth in administration of perioperative chemotherapy and a decline in postoperative mortality rate. By 2008, however, still more than half of patients were treated with surgery alone, suggesting that additional benefits may yet be derived.

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      Evaluation of risk factors for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: ABO blood group, hepatitis B virus and their synergism (pages 1867–1875)

      Yu Zhou, Quanbo Zhou, Qing Lin, Ruiwan Chen, Yuanfeng Gong, Yimin Liu, Min Yu, Bing Zeng, Kaiwen Li, Rufu Chen and Zhihua Li

      Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28196

      What's new?

      Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a suspected risk factor for extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ECC), though how it gives rise to malignant disease of the bile ducts situated outside the liver is unclear. Here, a significant association was found for HBV infection, A blood type, and ECC risk in the Han Chinese ethnic group of Southern China. Compared with non-A blood group ECC patients, type A ECC patients tended to be younger and had lower CA-125 and CA19-9 levels. The study is the first to confirm an association between A blood group, HBV, and ECC risk.

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      Benefits of catch-up in vaccination against human papillomavirus in medium- and low-income countries (pages 1876–1881)

      Iacopo Baussano, Fulvio Lazzarato, Guglielmo Ronco, Joakim Dillner and Silvia Franceschi

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28197

      What's new?

      To prevent cervical cancer, the WHO recommends that girls between the ages of 9-13 years be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV). In this study, the authors asked whether vaccinating older girls (12-15 years) as well, in a one-time “catch up” cohort, would provide enough additional benefit to be worthwhile. They found that this strategy brought forward the 50% reduction of HPV16/18 prevalence by as much as 5 years, in both a low-income and a medium-income country. As the cost of HPV vaccine decreases, this strategy may thus become desirable especially in low-income countries.

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      Plasma phospholipid fatty acids, dietary fatty acids and prostate cancer risk (pages 1882–1891)

      Julie K. Bassett, Gianluca Severi, Allison M. Hodge, Robert J. MacInnis, Robert A. Gibson, John L. Hopper, Dallas R. English and Graham G. Giles

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28203

      What's new?

      Animal and experimental studies have demonstrated that long'chain n'3 fatty acids inhibit the development of prostate cancer, whereas n'6 fatty acids might promote it. Whether similar associations exist for humans, however, has been unclear. This analysis of data from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study suggests that dietary intake of the n'6 linoleic acid and percentage of saturated fatty acid in plasma phospholipids are positively associated with prostate cancer risk. In addition, a higher percentage of n'9 oleic acid in plasma phospholipids was found to possibly reduce prostate cancer risk.

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      Childhood infectious diseases and risk of leukaemia in an adult population (pages 1892–1899)

      Stefano Parodi, Paolo Crosignani, Lucia Miligi, Oriana Nanni, Valerio Ramazzotti, Stefania Rodella, Adele Seniori Costantini, Rosario Tumino, Carla Vindigni, Paolo Vineis and Emanuele Stagnaro

      Version of Record online: 6 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28205

      What's new?

      We know that the retrovirus HTLV-1 is associated with adult leukemia, but little is known about the impact of other infections. For example, do childhood infections affect the risk of developing leukemia in adulthood? To begin to address this question, the authors analyzed a large multi-centre, case-control study, and found that childhood infections may actually lower the risk of developing chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) as an adult. This risk also decreased further as the number of infections increased.

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      Congenital malformations and testicular germ cell tumors (pages 1900–1904)

      Britton Trabert, Daniela Zugna, Lorenzo Richiardi, Katherine A. McGlynn and Olof Akre

      Version of Record online: 15 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28207

      What's new?

      While cryptorchidism is a known risk factor for testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT), few studies have evaluated the association between other birth defects and risk of TGCT. Using large, population-based registries in Sweden, the authors evaluated this important question and demonstrate that hypospadias, inguinal hernia, and other genital malformations are associated with an increased risk of TGCT. The findings highlight the importance of prenatal exposures related to proper genital development in the etiology of TGCT.

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      Association between physical activity and mortality in colorectal cancer: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies (pages 1905–1913)

      Youjin Je, Justin Y. Jeon, Edward L. Giovannucci and Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt

      Version of Record online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28208

      What's new?

      Everyone knows exercise is good for you, and it's been shown that physical activity reduces the risk of developing colorectal cancer. A new study investigated what impact exercise has on colorectal cancer outcomes. The authors included a large sample size from seven prospective cohort studies and compared levels of physical activity before and after diagnosis with mortality from all causes after diagnosis with colorectal cancer. They found that physical activity, undertaken either before or after diagnosis, reduces colon cancer mortality.

  6. Cancer Therapy

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Epidemiology
    7. Cancer Therapy
    8. Short Report
    9. Letters to the Editor
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      Promising biomarkers for predicting the outcomes of patients with KRAS wild-type metastatic colorectal cancer treated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibodies: A systematic review with meta-analysis (pages 1914–1925)

      Zu-Yao Yang, Xin-Yin Wu, Ya-Fang Huang, Meng-Yang Di, Da-Yong Zheng, Jin-Zhang Chen, Hong Ding, Chen Mao and Jin-Ling Tang

      Version of Record online: 13 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28153

      What's new?

      Metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is associated with a particularly poor prognosis. Monoclonal antibodies against EGFR are effective, but only for a small percentage of mCRC patients. KRAS mutations are a major predictive biomarker for resistance to anti-EGFR therapy; however, many patients with wild-type KRAS also fail to respond. In order to identify other potential biomarkers, the authors conducted a meta-analysis of previous studies, and found that BRAF mutation, PIK3CA exon 20 mutation, and PTEN loss were consistently associated with a poor response. These data may allow further selection of KRAS wild-type mCRC patients who may benefit from anti-EGFR treatment.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Erratum

      Vol. 135, Issue 2, E2, Version of Record online: 8 MAY 2014

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      Salmonella enhance chemosensitivity in tumor through connexin 43 upregulation (pages 1926–1935)

      Wen-Wei Chang, Chih-Ho Lai, Man-Chin Chen, Chi-Fan Liu, Yu-Diao Kuan, Song-Tao Lin and Che-Hsin Lee

      Version of Record online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28155

      What's new?

      Bacteria such as Salmonella have been studied as antitumor agents, and are known to activate the expression of the gap-junction protein Cx43 in tumor cells. Salmonella also enhances the effect of chemotherapy drugs, but the molecular mechanism of this additive effect has not been understood. In this study, the authors found that the bacteria not only cause increased intercellular communication between tumor cells due to Cx43 upregulation, but also increase mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathways. Salmonella presumably enhances the response to chemotherapy agents by increasing the passage of these drugs between neighboring tumor cells.

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      Hemangiosarcoma and its cancer stem cell subpopulation are effectively killed by a toxin targeted through epidermal growth factor and urokinase receptors (pages 1936–1944)

      Jill T. Schappa, Aric M. Frantz, Brandi H. Gorden, Erin B. Dickerson, Daniel A. Vallera and Jaime F. Modiano

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28187

      What's new?

      Sarcomas are aggressive, highly chemoresistant tumors with few treatment options. These data show for the first time that a bispecific ligand-targeted toxin composed of a Pseudomonas exotoxin conjugated to epidermal growth factor and urokinase (EGFuPA-toxin) induces cytotoxicity of highly chemoresistant sarcoma cells, including a subpopulation of cancer stem cells. The findings, which were obtained using cells derived from canine hemangiosarcoma, support the use of companion animal tumors for translational development of EGFuPA-toxin. While sarcomas are infrequent in humans, they occur spontaneously and frequently in domestic dogs, so the use of canine tumors could help accelerate further clinical development in humans.

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      Targeting the IL-4/IL-13 signaling pathway sensitizes Hodgkin lymphoma cells to chemotherapeutic drugs (pages 1945–1954)

      Antonino Natoli, Regine Lüpertz, Christian Merz, Wolfgang W. Müller, Rebecca Köhler, Peter H. Krammer and Min Li-Weber

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28189

      What's new?

      Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is one of few cancers that can be cured, but the incidence of deadly secondary cancers and other side effects that emerge decades later as a result of HL chemotherapy indicates a need for safer treatment strategies. One such strategy, described in this report, may entail sensitization of HL cells to traditional chemotherapeutic drugs using IL-4 inhibitors. IL-4 signaling was found to induce activation of STAT6, leading to upregulation of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL in HL cells. The pathway was effectively disrupted by the IL-4 antagonists APG598 and APG201.

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      TAK-441, a novel investigational smoothened antagonist, delays castration-resistant progression in prostate cancer by disrupting paracrine hedgehog signaling (pages 1955–1966)

      Naokazu Ibuki, Mazyar Ghaffari, Mitali Pandey, Irene Iu, Ladan Fazli, Masahide Kashiwagi, Hideaki Tojo, Osamu Nakanishi, Martin E. Gleave and Michael E. Cox

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28193

      What's new?

      Abnormal signaling through the Hedgehog family of growth factors has emerged as an important therapeutic target for solid tumor treatment. Here, the authors examine its relevance in prostate cancer management and demonstrate that expression of Sonic and Desert Hedgehog increases in prostate cancer tissue following hormone therapy for more than 6 months. Using a novel antagonist of Hedgehog signaling, the Smo inhibitor TAK-441, they show that treatment suppresses castration-resistant progression of prostrate cancer in an androgen-responsive xenograft model (LNCaP) by disrupting paracrine signaling with the host tumor infiltrate. These findings underscore the clinical potential of TAK-441 in the management of prostate cancer in patients.

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      IL-1β inhibits self-renewal capacity of dormant CD34+/CD38 acute myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo (pages 1967–1981)

      Jing Yang, Takayuki Ikezoe, Chie Nishioka, Atsuya Nobumoto and Akihito Yokoyama

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28198

      What's new?

      The persistence of self-renewing leukemia stem cells (LSCs) following chemotherapy is thought to play a major role in clinical relapse in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). LSCs reside within populations of CD34+/CD38 AML cells, which are reported here to express lower levels of the immune regulator IL-1β than their CD34+/CD38+ counterparts. Reduced expression was attributed to hypermethylation of the IL-1β promoter region. Forced expression of IL-1β was found to impair self-renewal capacity of CD34+/CD38 AML cells, both in vitro and in vivo, representing an attractive, potential treatment strategy for LSC eradication.

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      Pyrimethamine sensitizes pituitary adenomas cells to temozolomide through cathepsin B-dependent and caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways (pages 1982–1993)

      Congxin Dai, Bo Zhang, Xiaohai Liu, Kai Guo, Sihai Ma, Feng Cai, Yakun Yang, Yong Yao, Ming Feng, Xinjie Bao, Kan Deng, Yonghui Jiao, Zhenqing Wei, Wei Junji, Bing Xing, Wei Lian and Renzhi Wang

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28199

      What's new?

      Pituitary tumors are usually benign, slow-growing adenomas, but roughly a third grow rapidly with aggressive invasion of adjacent structures. In this study, the authors present evidence that the antimalarial agent pyrimethamine, known to inhibit tetrahydrofolic acid synthesis, represents a potential new therapy option for patients with invasive pituitary adenomas refractory to conventional treatment regimens. The authors show that pyrimethamine enhances the ability of the chemotherapeutic drug temozolomide to inhibit cell proliferation, induce apoptosis, and prevent invasion, possibly through cathepsin B– and caspase-dependent apoptosis induced by inhibition of the folate metabolism. Thus, the combination of pyrimethamine and temozolomide may be a new alternative in invasive pituitary adenoma therapy.

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      Strong expression of survivin is associated with positive response to radiotherapy and improved overall survival in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients (pages 1994–2003)

      Lovisa Farnebo, Katharina Tiefenböck, Anna Ansell, Lena K. Thunell, Stina Garvin and Karin Roberg

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28200

      What's new?

      Resistance to radiation therapy is a significant problem in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and has created a need for the discovery of markers predictive of radiotherapy response. One promising marker is survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis. Here, in pre-treatment biopsies from 40 patients with HNSCC, strong survivin expression was significantly associated with response to radiotherapy and increased overall survival. The data also indicate that single nucleotide polymorphisms in the genes XPD and FGFR4 are other possible predictors of overall survival after radiotherapy.

  7. Short Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Epidemiology
    7. Cancer Therapy
    8. Short Report
    9. Letters to the Editor
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      Polymorphisms in the XRCC1 gene modify survival of bladder cancer patients treated with chemotherapy (pages 2004–2009)

      Carlotta Sacerdote, Simonetta Guarrera, Fulvio Ricceri, Barbara Pardini, Silvia Polidoro, Alessandra Allione, Rossana Critelli, Alessia Russo, Angeline S. Andrew, Yuanqing Ye, Xifeng Wu, Lambertus A. Kiemeney, Andrea Bosio, Giovanni Casetta, Giuseppina Cucchiarale, Paolo Destefanis, Paolo Gontero, Luigi Rolle, Andrea Zitella, Dario Fontana, Paolo Vineis and Giuseppe Matullo

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28186

      What's new?

      While several studies have investigated the role of DNA repair genetic variants in cancer susceptibility, only few investigated their role in survival and response to chemotherapy for bladder cancer. The present study looked at the association between 28 SNPs in eight DNA repair genes and survival from bladder cancer in 456 bladder cancer patients. When receiving chemotherapy, patients who presented a higher number of genetic variants in the XRCC1 base-excision repair gene had a better survival, suggesting that proficient DNA repair results in resistance to therapy and shorter survival. This finding may have clinical implications for the choice of therapy.

  8. Letters to the Editor

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Reviews
    3. Cancer Cell Biology
    4. Cancer Genetics
    5. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    6. Epidemiology
    7. Cancer Therapy
    8. Short Report
    9. Letters to the Editor
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