You have free access to this content

International Journal of Cancer

Cover image for Vol. 135 Issue 3

01 August 2014

Volume 135, Issue 3

Pages 519–762

  1. Mini Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Cancer Genetics
    6. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Involvement of autophagy in cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancer (pages 519–528)

      T. Orfanelli, J.M. Jeong, G. Doulaveris, K. Holcomb and S.S. Witkin

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28524

  2. Carcinogenesis

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Cancer Genetics
    6. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Beneficial bacteria stimulate host immune cells to counteract dietary and genetic predisposition to mammary cancer in mice (pages 529–540)

      Jessica R. Lakritz, Theofilos Poutahidis, Tatiana Levkovich, Bernard J. Varian, Yassin M. Ibrahim, Antonis Chatzigiagkos, Sheyla Mirabal, Eric J. Alm and Susan E. Erdman

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28702

      What's new?

      Can eating fermented foods like yogurt ward off cancer? Recent studies have suggested it's possible. To find out how, these authors isolated the probiotic bacteria involved in fermentation and fed them to mice that were susceptible to mammary tumors. These mice either had genetic changes predisposing them to cancer or were fed a diet known to increase their likelihood of developing the tumors. Eating the lactic acid bacteria stimulated an immune response that delayed the onset of tumors in both models, suggesting a potential avenue to prevent the cancer in humans.

    2. You have free access to this content
      MicroRNA-224 inhibits progression of human prostate cancer by downregulating TRIB1 (pages 541–550)

      Zhuo-Yuan Lin, Ya-Qiang Huang, Yan-Qiong Zhang, Zhao-Dong Han, Hui-Chan He, Xiao-Hui Ling, Xin Fu, Qi-Shan Dai, Chao Cai, Jia-Hong Chen, Yu-Xiang Liang, Fu-Neng Jiang, Wei-De Zhong, Fen Wang and Chin-Lee Wu

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28707

      What's new?

      Dysregulation of microRNA expression in cancer suggests that small, noncoding RNAs could be valuable biomarkers for disease detection and management. This study examined the role of miR-224 expression in prostate cancer. The findings indicate that abnormal miR-224 expression and its target TRIB1, a regulator of intracellular signalling, may be associated with aggressive progression and poor prognosis of prostate cancer. The tumor suppressive effects of miR-224 in prostate cancer may be partially mediated by down-regulating TRIB1 expression.

  3. Cancer Cell Biology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Cancer Genetics
    6. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cell type specific interleukin-6 induced responses in tumor keratinocytes and stromal fibroblasts are essential for invasive growth (pages 551–562)

      Sofia Depner, Wiltrud Lederle, Claudia Gutschalk, Nina Linde, Alexandra Zajonz and Margareta M. Mueller

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.27951

      What's new?

      Interleukin-6 (IL-6) appears to be a key factor in the progression to malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), but the mechanism by which it induces an invasive tumor phenotype has been unclear. Here, in a human SCC model, IL-6 was found to activate stromal fibroblasts, drive progression toward a tumor associated fibroblast (TAF) phenotype, and promote tumor invasion via metalloproteinase-2 activation. These cooperative effects reveal a new level of complexity in IL-6 tumor signaling and suggest that the cytokine could be a novel therapeutic target.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Low SOX17 expression is a prognostic factor and drives transcriptional dysregulation and esophageal cancer progression (pages 563–573)

      I-Ying Kuo, Ching-Chi Wu, Jia-Ming Chang, Yu-Lin Huang, Chien-Hsun Lin, Jing-Jou Yan, Bor-Shyang Sheu, Pei-Jung Lu, Wei-Lun Chang, Wu-Wei Lai and Yi-Ching Wang

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28695

      What's new?

      While the SOX17 gene is known to encode a transcription factor important for esophagus tissue development, the transcriptional network of SOX17 and the prognostic impact of SOX17 protein expression in human cancers both remain largely unclear. Here, the authors discovered the first transcriptional network of SOX17 in cancer and verified the novel transcriptional repression target genes of SOX17 involved in migration and invasion of esophageal cancer. They provided evidence for metastasis suppression by SOX17 in an animal model and identified low SOX17 expression as a prognosis marker in esophageal cancer patients, indicating SOX17 as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Knockdown of Nrf2 suppresses glioblastoma angiogenesis by inhibiting hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1α (pages 574–584)

      Xiangjun Ji, Handong Wang, Jianhong Zhu, Lin Zhu, Hao Pan, Wei Li, Yuan Zhou, Zixiang Cong, Feng Yan and Suihua Chen

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28699

      What's new?

      Nrf2, an important transcriptional factor in cellular responses to oxidative stress, is strongly suspected to play a pivotal role in cancer cellsurvival and tumor growth. But the role of Nrf2 in tumor vascular biology has yet to be mechanistically determined. This study demonstrated for the first time that Nrf2 played a pivotal role in glioblastoma angiogenesis. Human glioblastomatissues expressing higher Nrf2 levels showed relatively higher microvessel density. Knockdown of Nrf2 in hypoxia led to reduced angiogenesis through lower HIF-1α-VEGF signaling. The findings highlighted Nrf2 as a candidate molecular target for controlling glioblastoma angiogenesis throughblockade of HIF-1α signaling.

  4. Cancer Genetics

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Cancer Genetics
    6. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Epigenetic determinants of ovarian clear cell carcinoma biology (pages 585–597)

      Ken Yamaguchi, Zhiqing Huang, Noriomi Matsumura, Masaki Mandai, Takako Okamoto, Tsukasa Baba, Ikuo Konishi, Andrew Berchuck and Susan K. Murphy

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28701

      What's new?

      Ovarian cancer has several subtypes, and although different genetic mutations have been associated with particular subtypes, the molecular characteristics of ovarian clear cell carcinoma remain hazy. Aberrant DNA methylation can turn cells cancerous, and this study compared patterns of gene methylation in ovarian clear cell carcinomas, other ovarian cancer cells, and normal cells. They found that the clear cell carcinomas could indeed be identified by their distinctive pattern of DNA methylation. They found that this methylation pattern increased expression of certain stress response genes, while other genes, with tumor suppressive functions, were stifled.

    2. You have free access to this content
      DNA methylation profiling of well-differentiated thyroid cancer uncovers markers of recurrence free survival (pages 598–610)

      Veronika Mancikova, Raquel Buj, Esmeralda Castelblanco, Lucía Inglada-Pérez, Anna Diez, Aguirre A. de Cubas, Maria Curras-Freixes, Francisco Xavier Maravall, Didac Mauricio, Xavier Matias-Guiu, Manel Puig-Domingo, Ismael Capel, María Rosa Bella, Enrique Lerma, Eva Castella, Jordi Lluis Reverter, Miguel Ángel Peinado, Mireia Jorda and Mercedes Robledo

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28703

      What's new?

      Follicular cell-derived carcinomas of the thyroid gland, which are the most common endocrine malignancies, are of special interest for molecular research, given their common cellular origin. However, whether epigenetic modifications contribute to the heterogeneous nature of follicular thyroid malignancies remains unclear. Here, genome-wide characterization of DNA methylation patterns of well-differentiated thyroid tumors shows that tumors with distinct subtypes and mutational status have unique methylation profiles, offering insight into the biology underlying the heterogeneity and differential outcomes of thyroid cancers. Novel markers associated with recurrence-free survival were also identified and could be used for patient classification.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Exome sequencing reveals frequent inactivating mutations in ARID1A, ARID1B, ARID2 and ARID4A in microsatellite unstable colorectal cancer (pages 611–623)

      Tatiana Cajuso, Ulrika A. Hänninen, Johanna Kondelin, Alexandra E. Gylfe, Tomas Tanskanen, Riku Katainen, Esa Pitkänen, Heikki Ristolainen, Eevi Kaasinen, Minna Taipale, Jussi Taipale, Jan Böhm, Laura Renkonen-Sinisalo, Jukka-Pekka Mecklin, Heikki Järvinen, Sari Tuupanen, Outi Kilpivaara and Pia Vahteristo

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28705

      What's new?

      ARID1A was recently identified as a novel tumor suppressor gene. In this study, the authors used exome sequencing to analyze mutation frequency in ARID1A and other members of the ARID gene family in microsatellite-unstable (MSI) colorectal cancer (CRC). They found inactivating mutations in ARID1A in 39% of these tumors. Three other ARID genes (ARID1B, ARID2 and ARID4A) were frequently mutated as well. These results indicate that members of the ARID gene family may play an important role in MSI CRC and other human cancers.

  5. Infectious Causes of Cancer

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Cancer Genetics
    6. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      The influence of type-specific human papillomavirus infections on the detection of cervical precancer and cancer: A population-based study of opportunistic cervical screening in the United States (pages 624–634)

      Cosette M. Wheeler, William C. Hunt, Jack Cuzick, Erika Langsfeld, Michael Robertson, Philip E. Castle and New Mexico HPV Pap Registry Steering Committee

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28605

      What's new?

      Age, cytologic diagnosis, and human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype are key factors in deciding how cervical precancer and cancer patients should be managed, but few studies have had sufficient case numbers to examine interplay among these factors. In this study, age, cytologic diagnosis, and HPV genotype were found to contribute independently to disease detection. A substantial proportion of disease occurred when women were cytology negative but high-risk HPV-positive. The data provide baseline measurements to judge HPV vaccination and cervical screening effectiveness in U.S. populations, where these interventions are delivered opportunistically.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Epigenetic silencing of SFRP1 and SFRP5 by hepatitis B virus X protein enhances hepatoma cell tumorigenicity through Wnt signaling pathway (pages 635–646)

      Qing Xie, Linlin Chen, Xuefeng Shan, Xiaoliang Shan, Jia Tang, Fan Zhou, Qingmei Chen, Huiqin Quan, Dan Nie, Wenlu Zhang, Ai-Long Huang and Ni Tang

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28697

      What's new?

      Abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been associated with liver carcinogenesis. For example, potent antagonists of the pathway, the secreted frizzled-related proteins (SFRPs), are downregulated in hepatocellular carcinomas associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Here, the authors show that the HBV X protein induces the epigenetic silencing of SFRPs, thus promoting hepatoma cell proliferation and advancing epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The study points to inhibitors of DNA methylation as potential new therapeutics for HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Lipid A controls the robustness of intratumoral accumulation of attenuated Salmonella in mice (pages 647–657)

      Miaomin Zhang, Charles A. Swofford and Neil S. Forbes

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28700

      What's new?

      The bacteria Salmonella, infamous for causing disease, could be harnessed to treat cancer. Unfortunately, though they have been engineered to kill tumor cells, these bacteria fail to accumulate in human tumors. In this report, the authors propose that the genetic alteration necessary to make the bacteria safe also interferes with tumor-targeting ability. They tried administering the therapeutic bacteria together with the compound lipid A, which the engineered Salmonella can no longer produce. The addition of lipid A enhanced tumor targeting without restoring the bacteria's toxicity, suggesting it could make Salmonella safe and effective for treating cancer.

  6. Early Detection and Diagnosis

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Cancer Genetics
    6. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      NMR and LC/MS-based global metabolomics to identify serum biomarkers differentiating hepatocellular carcinoma from liver cirrhosis (pages 658–668)

      Yue Liu, Zhanying Hong, Guangguo Tan, Xin Dong, Genjin Yang, Liang Zhao, Xiaofei Chen, Zhenyu Zhu, Ziyang Lou, Baohua Qian, Guoqing Zhang and Yifeng Chai

      Article first published online: 17 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28706

      What's new?

      Hepatocellular cancer is frequently deadly, and difficult to detect early. Clinicians need a better way to identify the disease in high-risk populations, such as cirrhosis patients. To find one, these authors combined imaging techniques with a sophisticated classification algorithm to tease out predictive biomarkers. They analyzed serum from healthy individuals, cirrhosis patients, and those with hepatocellular cancer, profiling the metabolome to get a comprehensive snapshot of the cell's contents. Applying the classification algorithm revealed a distinctive biomarker profile in the hepatocellular cancer patients, which could help provide better diagnostic techniques for this cancer.

  7. Epidemiology

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Cancer Genetics
    6. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Heterogeneity of epidemiological factors by breast tumor subtypes in Korean women: A case–case study (pages 669–681)

      Nan Song, Ji-Yeob Choi, Hyuna Sung, Seokang Chung, Minkyo Song, Sue K. Park, Wonshik Han, Jong Won Lee, Mi Kyung Kim, Keun-Young Yoo, Sei-Hyun Ahn, Dong-Young Noh and Daehee Kang

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28685

      What's New?

      Breast cancer behaves differently depending on whether tumor cells express certain hormone or growth-factor receptors (ER, PR, HER2, etc.) However, it isn't clear how these subtypes are related to epidemiological factors. In addition, only a few epidemiological studies have been conducted in Asian populations. In this case-case study of Korean women, the authors found that age, body-mass index, and reproductive factors were differentially associated with the various receptor-status subtypes. These findings provide epidemiological evidence regarding the etiological heterogeneity of breast tumor subtypes.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Leisure-time physical activity and endometrial cancer risk: Dose–response meta-analysis of epidemiological studies (pages 682–694)

      NaNa Keum, Woong Ju, Dong Hoon Lee, Eric L. Ding, Chung C. Hsieh, Julie E. Goodman and Edward L. Giovannucci

      Article first published online: 3 MAR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28687

      What's new?

      Physical activity offers protection against endometrial cancer (EC), but it does so in a dose-response manner, with duration and type of activity possibly influencing the degree of EC risk reduction. In this meta-analysis of observational studies, the dose-response relationship between leisure-time physical activity and EC risk was found to be linear, with increasing physical activity (measured as metabolic equivalent of task [MET]-hours/week or hour/week) being linked to a continued decrease in EC risk. Non-linear meta-analysis suggested that benefits may plateau at 10 MET-hours/week, but the finding was driven by one study.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Lifetime growth and risk of testicular cancer (pages 695–701)

      Lorenzo Richiardi, Loredana Vizzini, Guido Pastore, Nereo Segnan, Anna Gillio-Tos, Valentina Fiano, Chiara Grasso, Libero Ciuffreda, Patrizia Lista, Neil Pearce and Franco Merletti

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28688

      What's new?

      Adult height is known to be associated with testicular cancer risk. In this case-control study, the authors examined the extent to which this association is explained by height at various points in life, and also by parental height. They found that adult height is associated with testicular cancer risk, while parental height is not. These findings suggest that the consistently reported association between growth and testicular cancer is likely to be explained by the effect of environmental exposures.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Breast cancer survival in Ethiopia: A cohort study of 1,070 women (pages 702–709)

      E.J. Kantelhardt, P. Zerche, A. Mathewos, P. Trocchi, A. Addissie, A. Aynalem, T. Wondemagegnehu, T. Ersumo, A. Reeler, B. Yonas, M. Tinsae, T. Gemechu, A. Jemal, C. Thomssen, A. Stang and S. Bogale

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28691

      What's new?

      There is little information on breast cancer survival in Ethiopia and other parts of sub-Saharan Africa. This study is the first to report on outcome of a large cohort of sub-Saharan patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer receiving standardized therapy in the only oncologic referral center in Ethiopia. Based on 1,070 patients with a median follow-up of 23 months, the study found a distant metastasis-free survival (MFS) after 2 years of 74% - a rather favorable outcome considering the limited resources. The effect of potential determinants on MFS was estimated, with young age and advanced stage both associated with poor outcome.

  8. Cancer Therapy

    1. Top of page
    2. Mini Review
    3. Carcinogenesis
    4. Cancer Cell Biology
    5. Cancer Genetics
    6. Infectious Causes of Cancer
    7. Early Detection and Diagnosis
    8. Epidemiology
    9. Cancer Therapy
    1. You have free access to this content
      Coupling to a glioblastoma-directed antibody potentiates antitumor activity of curcumin (pages 710–719)

      Phyllis Langone, Priya Ranjan Debata, Joseph Del Rosario Inigo, Sukanta Dolai, Sumit Mukherjee, Peter Halat, Kristina Mastroianni, Gina Marie Curcio, Mario R. Castellanos, Krishnaswami Raja and Probal Banerjee

      Article first published online: 2 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28555

      What's new?

      Curcumin, the most active ingredient of the yellow spice turmeric traditionally used in Indian cuisine, has known antitumor activities. However, its low bioavailability is a major obstacle to its use in cancer therapy. Here the authors tested the efficacy of curcumin in cell culture and mouse models of glioblastoma, a highly treatment-resistant brain cancer. Curcumin was reversibly coupled to the glioblastoma-specific CD68 antibody, which resulted in a markedly increased efficacy to eliminate glioblastoma cells in vivo. The study raises hope that with the appropriate targeting curcumin may rise to a new anti-brain cancer agent in the future.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Serotype chimeric oncolytic adenovirus coding for GM-CSF for treatment of sarcoma in rodents and humans (pages 720–730)

      Simona Bramante, Anniina Koski, Anja Kipar, Iulia Diaconu, Ilkka Liikanen, Otto Hemminki, Lotta Vassilev, Suvi Parviainen, Vincenzo Cerullo, Saila K Pesonen, Minna Oksanen, Raita Heiskanen, Noora Rouvinen-Lagerström, Maiju Merisalo-Soikkeli, Tiina Hakonen, Timo Joensuu, Anna Kanerva, Sari Pesonen and Akseli Hemminki

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28696

      What's new?

      Oncolytic viruses are a promising treatment strategy against cancer. They can also be used as gene-therapy vectors, to further stimulate the antitumor immune response. In this study, the authors evaluated an adenovirus carrying the gene for GM-CSF, with positive results in animal models of soft-tissue sarcoma (STS). The study also demonstrated that the virus can spread to non-injected tumors, suggesting that it might be useful for the treatment of metastatic disease. Furthermore, the treatment was well-tolerated in human sarcoma patients, with evidence of antitumor efficacy, supporting further clinical trials.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Proangiogenic tumor proteins as potential predictive or prognostic biomarkers for bevacizumab therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer (pages 731–741)

      Maressa A. Bruhn, Amanda R. Townsend, Chee Khoon Lee, Aravind Shivasami, Timothy J. Price, Joe Wrin, Georgia Arentz, Niall C. Tebbutt, Christopher Hocking, David Cunningham and Jennifer E. Hardingham, on behalf of the BHI in collaboration with AGITG

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28698

      What's new?

      There is a pressing need for predictive biomarkers to better identify metastatic colorectal cancer patients who would benefit from anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab therapy. This study is the first to measure the expression levels of a panel of angiogenic proteins from FFPE tumors and to also use a multiplex assay platform--an advantage given the limited amount of tissue available from clinical trials. Low tumor VEGF-A was associated with significantly longer progression free survival after adjustment for other baseline factors. However neither VEGF-A, nor the other angiogenic proteins IL-6, IL-8, bFGF or PDGF-BB, were predictive of outcome for bevacizumab therapy.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Antisense oligonucleotides against TNFR1 prevent toxicity of TNF/IFNγ treatment in mouse tumor models (pages 742–750)

      Filip Van Hauwermeiren, Roosmarijn E. Vandenbroucke, Lynda Grine, Leen Puimège, Elien Van Wonterghem, Hong Zhang and Claude Libert

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28704

      What's new?

      Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) can produce potent antitumor effects as well as potentially life-threatening systemic inflammation, which has limited its therapeutic use. Different strategies to overcome systemic toxicity have been explored, including the inhibition of mediators of TNF-induced toxicity. Here, antisense oligonucleotides targeted against TNFR1 (P55), the primary mediating receptor in models of both acute TNF toxicity and TNF/IFNγ antitumor activity, were found to effectively lower TNFR1 protein levels in select tissues and thereby reduce toxicity associated with TNF/IFNγ therapy, without affecting antitumor activity. The findings provide new evidence for the applicability and safety of TNF/IFNγ therapy.

    5. You have free access to this content
      CDKN1A-mediated responsiveness of MLL-AF4-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia to Aurora kinase-A inhibitors (pages 751–762)

      Ya-Ping Chen, Hui-Ju Lin, Jiann-Shiuh Chen, Ming-Ying Tsai, Hsing-Pang Hsieh, Jang-Yang Chang, Nai-Feng Chen, Kung-Chao Chang, Wen-Tsung Huang, Wu-Chou Su, Shu-Ting Yang, Wen-Chang Chang, Liang-Yi Hung and Tsai-Yun Chen

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/ijc.28708

      What's new?

      Aurora kinase overexpression is a phenomenon of many cancers, including hematologic malignancies, such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This study suggests that Aurora-A kinase inhibitors may have clinical utility in MLL-AF4-positive ALL and provides insight into the role of CDKN1A expression in governing ALL cell responsiveness to the drugs. CDKN1A acts in a TP53-independent manner and thereby serves as an indicator to determine drug responsiveness specifically in MLL-AF4-positive ALL cells.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION