Polyimine Container Molecules and Nanocapsules

Authors

  • Nicholas M. Rue,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA phone:+1 (0)732 445-8432 fax:+1 (0)732 445-5312
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  • Junling Sun,

    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA phone:+1 (0)732 445-8432 fax:+1 (0)732 445-5312
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  • Ralf Warmuth

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA phone:+1 (0)732 445-8432 fax:+1 (0)732 445-5312
    • Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 610 Taylor Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA phone:+1 (0)732 445-8432 fax:+1 (0)732 445-5312
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The field of dynamic covalent nanocapsule synthesis is very young, and most contributions to the development of reliable approaches for the assembly of dynamic covalent capsules have been made during the past five years. In 1991, Quan and Cram published the first Schiff base molecular container compound. Over the past six years, a large number of multi-component polyimine hemicarcerand and polyhedron syntheses have been developed. This review will focus primarily on recent achievements in the area of pure Schiff base nanocapsules and highlight different synthetic approaches and design strategies, as well as first applications of these capsules in molecular recognition, gas storage, and gas separation.

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