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Photochemical Flow Reactions

Authors

  • Elaine M. Schuster,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel), Phone: +972-8-934-4240, Fax: +972-8-934-4124
    • Elaine M. Schuster, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel), Phone: +972-8-934-4240, Fax: +972-8-934-4124

      Peter Wipf, Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (USA), Phone: +1-412-624-8606: Fax: +1-412-624-0787:

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  • Peter Wipf

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (USA), Phone: +1-412-624-8606: Fax: +1-412-624-0787:
    • Elaine M. Schuster, Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel), Phone: +972-8-934-4240, Fax: +972-8-934-4124

      Peter Wipf, Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (USA), Phone: +1-412-624-8606: Fax: +1-412-624-0787:

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The versatility of photochemical flow processes is rapidly expanding, and we suggest that this technique is capable of broadening the general appeal and impact of photochemistry similar or even to a greater extent to what microwave technology has done to thermal processes. This review highlights the recent developments that support this suggestion as well as the technological challenges that have yet to be resolved. Continuous photoflow reactions allow for better control over heating and mixing, are safer to operate on scale-up, in particular if LEDs are used in place of Hg lamps, they offer a higher surface/volume ratio and more efficient light penetration than batch mode photoreactions, and furthermore allow for the removal of products in-line to avoid secondary decompositions and poor conversions.

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