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Interpersonal choice: The advantage on the left or on the right?

Authors

  • Xueru Zhao,

    1. School of Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science, Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
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  • Xianyou He,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science, Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
    • Correspondence should be addressed to: Xianyou He, School of Psychology, South China Normal University, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510631, P. R. China. (E-mail: xianyouhe@163.com).

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  • Wei Zhang,

    1. School of Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science, Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
    2. School of Architecture, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, China
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  • Guangyao Chen,

    1. Journalism and Communication College, Jinan University, Guangzhou, China
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  • Qing Chen,

    1. School of Psychology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
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  • Lixiang Huang

    1. School of Psychology, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Mental Health and Cognitive Science, Center for Studies of Psychological Application, South China Normal University, Guangzhou, China
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  • We state that all the authors and co-authors have given substantial contribution for this article. X.R. Zhao and X.Y. He designed the research. X.R. Zhao and L.X. Huang collected the experimental materials. X.R. Zhao and W. Zhang conducted the research. X.R. Zhao and G.Y. Chen analysed the data. X.R. Zhao, X.Y. He and Q. Chen wrote the article. All authors approved the final version of the article for submission.

Abstract

This study explored whether body specificity unconsciously influenced preferences for certain people. Participants were presented pictures of the heads of 2 persons who were described as having the similar personality, profession and family background. They were instructed to choose 1 in each pair as the preferred date, preferred friend, more charismatic boss or as the better national leader. The results showed body specificity had an influence on the selection preference on first impression. Participants tended to choose the character on their dominant-hand side. This study not only provided the first social psychological evidence for the body-specificity hypothesis, but also first demonstrated a role for body specificity in impression formation and selection preference.

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