Regulation of renal function and structure by the signaling Na/K-ATPase

Authors

  • Jeffrey X. Xie,

    1. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, USA
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  • Xin Li,

    1. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, USA
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  • Zijian Xie

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, USA
    • Address correspondence to: Zijian Xie, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Mail Stop 1008, College of Medicine, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614, USA. Tel.: +1–419-383–4182. Fax: +1–419-383–2871. E-mail: Zi-jian.Xie@utoledo.edu

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Abstract

The Na/K-ATPase as an essential ion pump was discovered more than 50 years ago (Skou (1989) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1000, 439–446; Feraille and Doucet (2001) Physiol. Rev. 81, 345–418). The signaling function of Na/K-ATPase has been gradually appreciated over the last 20 years, first from the studies of regulatory effects of ouabain on cardiac cell growth. Several reviews on this topic have been written during the last few years (Schoner and Scheiner-Bobis (2007) Am. J. Physiol. Cell. Physiol. 293, C509-C536; Xie and Cai (2003) Mol. Interv. 3, 157 – 168; Bagrov et al. (2009) Pharmacol. Rev. 61, 9–38; Tian and Xie (2008) Physiology 23, 205–211; Fontana et al. (2013) FEBS J. 280, 5450–5455; Blanco and Wallace (2013) Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol. 305, F797-F812). This article will focus on the molecular mechanism of Na/K-ATPase-mediated signal transduction and its potential regulatory role in renal physiology and diseases. © 2013 IUBMB Life, 65(12):991–998, 2013.

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