Guardian of the Furnace: Mitochondria, TRAP1, ROS and stem cell maintenance

Authors

  • Rose Kadye,

    1. Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
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  • Adam H. Kramer,

    1. Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
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  • Julia Joos-Vandewalle,

    1. Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
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  • Michelle Parsons,

    1. Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
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  • Zikhona Njengele,

    1. Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
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  • Heinrich Hoppe,

    1. Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
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  • Earl Prinsloo

    Corresponding author
    1. Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
    • Address correspondence to: Earl Prinsloo, Biomedical Biotechnology Research Unit, Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Biotechnology, PO Box 94, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, 6140, South Africa. Tel: +27466038082. Fax: +27466223984; E-mail: e.prinsloo@ru.ac.za

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Abstract

Mitochondria are key to eukaryotic cell survival and their activity is linked to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which in turn acts as both an intracellular signal and an effective executioner of cells with regards to cellular senescence. The mitochondrial molecular chaperone tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein 1 (TRAP1) is often termed the cytoprotective chaperone for its role in cancer cell survival and protection from apoptosis. Here, we hypothesize that TRAP1 serves to modulate mitochondrial activity in stem cell maintenance, survival and differentiation. © 2013 IUBMB Life, 66(1):42–45, 2014

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