Psychological factors predict local and referred experimental muscle pain: A cluster analysis in healthy adults

Authors


  • Funding sources

    Research reported in this publication was supported in part by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) under Award Number K01AR056134, through the NIH sponsored Comprehensive Opportunities in Rehabilitation Research Training grant (CORRT, K12HD0055931) and the University of Iowa Ballard Seashore dissertation fellowship. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH.

  • Conflicts of interest

    The authors have no conflicts of interest to report.

Correspondence

Laura Frey-Law

E-mail: laura-freylaw@uiowa.edu

Abstract

Background

Recent studies suggest an underlying three- or four-factor structure explains the conceptual overlap and distinctiveness of several negative emotionality and pain-related constructs. However, the validity of these latent factors for predicting pain has not been examined.

Methods

A cohort of 189 (99 female, 90 male) healthy volunteers completed eight self-report negative emotionality and pain-related measures (Eysenck Personality Questionnaire – Revised, Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Fear of Pain Questionnaire; Somatosensory Amplification Scale, Anxiety Sensitivity Index and Whiteley Index). Using principal axis factoring, three primary latent factors were extracted: general distress, catastrophic thinking and pain-related fear. Using these factors, individuals clustered into three subgroups of high, moderate and low negative emotionality responses. Experimental pain was induced via intramuscular acidic infusion into the anterior tibialis muscle, producing local (infusion site) and/or referred (anterior ankle) pain and hyperalgesia.

Results

Pain outcomes differed between clusters (multivariate analysis of variance and multinomial regression), with individuals in the highest negative emotionality cluster reporting the greatest local pain (p = 0.05), mechanical hyperalgesia (pressure pain thresholds; p = 0.009) and greater odds (2.21 odds ratio) of experiencing referred pain when compared to the lowest negative emotionality cluster.

Conclusion

Our results provide support for three latent psychological factors explaining the majority of the variance between several pain-related psychological measures, and that individuals in the high negative emotionality subgroup are at increased risk for (1) acute local muscle pain; (2) local hyperalgesia; and (3) referred pain using a standardized nociceptive input.

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