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Job stress is associated with migraine in current workers: The Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)

Authors

  • I.S. Santos,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
    2. Centre for Clinical and Epidemiological Research, Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
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  • R.H. Griep,

    1. Laboratory of Health and Environment Education, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • M.G.M. Alves,

    1. Departamento de Planejamento em Saúde do Instituto de Saúde da Comunidade, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • A.C. Goulart,

    1. Centre for Clinical and Epidemiological Research, Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
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  • P.A. Lotufo,

    1. Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
    2. Centre for Clinical and Epidemiological Research, Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
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  • S.M. Barreto,

    1. Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil
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  • D. Chor,

    1. Escola Nacional de Saúde Pública, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
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  • I.M. Benseñor

    1. Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
    2. Centre for Clinical and Epidemiological Research, Hospital Universitário da Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil
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  • Funding sources

    The ELSA-Brasil baseline study was supported by the Brazilian Ministry of Health (Science and Technology Department) and the Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology (Financiadora de Estudos e Projetos and CNPq National Research Council) (grants 01 06 0010.00 RS, 01 06 0212.00 BA, 01 06 0300.00 ES, 01 06 0278.00 MG, 01 06 0115.00 SP, 01 06 0071.00 RJ). The funding source did not contribute to study design, data analysis or decision to publish.

  • Conflicts of interest

    The authors report no conflicts of interest. As a disclosure, R.H.G., P.A.L., S.M.B., D.C. and I.M.B. are recipients of a fellowship from the Brazilian National Research Council (CNPq).

Abstract

Background

Migraine is an important source of social burden and work-related costs. Studies addressing the association of migraine with job stress are rare.

Objectives

The aim of this paper was to study the association of job stress components and migraine using structured, validated questionnaires that were part of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

Methods

The ELSA-Brasil is a multicentre cohort of 15,105 civil servants (12,096 current workers) in Brazil. Job strain was assessed using the 17-item Brazilian version of the Swedish Demand-Control-Support Questionnaire. Headache episodes in the preceding 12 months were assessed using a questionnaire based on the International Headache Society criteria. We analysed the association between job stress domains and migraine in men and women using adjusted logistic regression and interaction models.

Results

We included 3113 individuals without headache and 3259 migraineurs. Low job control [odds ratio (OR) 1.30; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.10–1.53], high job demands (OR 1.37; 95% CI 1.18–1.59) and low social support (OR 1.49; 95% CI 1.29–1.71) were associated with migraine. Job control was more strongly associated with migraine in women (p for interaction = 0.02). High-strain (high demand and low control) jobs were associated with migraine in both men (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.11–1.97) and women (OR 1.51; 95% CI 1.17–1.95).

Conclusions

We observed a strong association between high-strain jobs and migraine. Job control was a stronger migraine-related factor for women. Low social support was associated with migraine in both sexes.

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