Lipolysis in Intraabdorninal Adipose Tissues of Obese Women and Men

Authors

  • Susan K. Fried,

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Human Behavior and Metabolism. Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    2. Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick. NJ 08903. USA
    3. Obesity Research Center, New York, NY 10025, USA.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rudolph L. Leibel,

    1. Department of Nutritional Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick. NJ 08903. USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Neilé K. Edens,

    1. Laboratory of Human Behavior and Metabolism. Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • John G. Kral

    1. Department of Surgery. SUNY Health Science Center Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York 11203, USA
    2. Obesity Research Center, New York, NY 10025, USA.
    3. Division of Surgical Metabolism St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY 10025, USA.
    Search for more papers by this author

Rutgers, The State University, Department of Nutritional Sciences, Cook College, Thompson Hall, P.O. Box 231 New Bmnswick, NJ 08903.

Abstract

Intraabdominal fat in humans is located in two major depots, the omental and mesenteric. We compared basal and stimulated lipolysis in adipose tissue from these two depots and the subcutaneous abdominal depot of obese women and men. Omental fat cells of women are smaller and have lower rates of basal lipolysis than in men. Basal Iipolysis rates are significantly higher in subcutaneous than intraabdominal adipose tissues of both genders. In men, the incremental lipolytic response to norepinephrine is significantly greater in both intraabdominal fat depots than in the subcutaneous fat, while in women tlie response of tlie mesenteric is lower than tlie omental. In women, but not men, responsiveness to tlie beta agonist isoproterenol is also increased in omental tissue. Thus, in women, omental and mesenteric adipose tissues show distinctly different metabolic properties which may moderate the impact of intraabdominal obesity.

Ancillary